English 121 Syllabus

English 121 Syllabus

Humanities Literature:
THE HERO’S JOURNEY

"A hero ventures forth from the world of the common day into a region of supernatural wonder. Fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: The hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man" (1949, p. 30).

-Joseph Campbell,
The Hero with a Thousand Faces



Instructor: Marlen Elliot Harrison, MA
Course: English 121 – 022
Room: Leonard 219,
T/Th 8-9:15
Office hours: T/Th 11-12:15; W 10-12:30 (please make an appt)
Office: 201 G Leonard Hall
Mailbox: Faculty mailbox in Leonard 110
Office Phone: 724-357-2276 Email: M.E.Harrison@iup.edu
Cell Phone: 561-716-6690

SYLLABUS

NOTE: This is a literature course; there is no way to pass this course if you do not read ALL of the assigned works. Though not an easy class, I believe that this section of English 121 will be both emotionally and personally rewarding if you invest the time and thought.
Course Description and Rationale: Throughout our lives, we are constantly embarking on, making our way along, and coming to the end of journeys. Some journeys might require physical movement from one location to the next, while others may be spiritual or even sexual. Some journeys require us to climb mountains and slay dragons, either metaphorically or in reality. For example, you are all about to take a journey through time exploring heroic journeys throughout both literature and your own experiences. By examining the archetypal "hero’s journey", also known as the "monomyth (click me)", it is my intention to help you examine common patterns of human behavior across time and around the world, not only in literature, but in your own lives as well. There is a hero in each of us, but as we will soon see, there is often a price to be paid for such heroism.

In this course, we’ll mainly examine various works of literature, film, and poetry, all chosen for the themes they share (and because they are some of my personal favorites). Whether it’s the homebound Greek hero, Ulysses, or Miss Celie’s heroic journey to overcoming oppression and discovering her true self in The Color Purple, everything that we read will have a common theme – The Hero’s Journey.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Via the course readings and class discussions and projects, you will experience, discuss, and practice composing a variety of writing styles, genres, and/or structures with the intent to reveal information to a reader that answers questions about themes related to heroic journeys. These styles/genres will include blog writing, poetry, and other styles/genres of your choice.
  • You will achieve a firm understanding of the monomyth, including archetypes, liminal crossings, and the tragic flaws of the hero via reflective writings, discussions, and projects.
  • You will read a variety of novels and various other printed matter, including poetry, in order to gain an appreciation for written forms of creative expression and literary explorations of the hero’s journey.
  • You will develop an on-line presence (blog), complete a mid-term paper, and complete an end of semester project.
  • You will apply what you learned in Engl 101 in order to practice integrating readings by way of referencing words, phrases, and sentences that are meaningful to you as you write your own blog posts and reflective essays and projects.
  • Through regular in-class workshops and through blog participation, you will develop your ability to respond to both the writings and ideas of peers and your own writings and ideas in helpful ways.
  • You will actively examine the journeys you have taken/are taking throughout your own life. You will complete a bound book of poetry that reflects the various stages of your own heroic journeys.
  • You will choose one or more of your poems and submit this work for publication (or consider submitting for publication).

Required Texts: See list below.

  • You are responsible for having your texts and reading materials with you at all class meetings!!!
  • Check Amazon.com, Ebay.com, BarnesandNoble.com, and Half.com for inexpensive alternatives to

Required Materials: You will need: access to a computer, a printer, and the internet; an active email account; a notebook; a pen; a highlighter; a folder in which to keep handouts and other printed matter; and it would be wise to also have a dictionary/thesaurus and a flash/jump drive.

Class Format: In this class, you will do a lot of individual reading and writing, and you will also work together in small groups for feedback and discussion. At the beginning of each class, we will review the homework posted to our blogs by our group members and offer comments and questions. We will then spend time reading literature reflective of the week’s theme and then discuss the reading first within our groups and then together as a class. We will also spend some time exploring "research" by watching film and television excerpts and enjoying related activities when applicable. The remainder of the class will be scheduled for creative activities and discussion.


Assignments:

  • Reaflective Responses: You will have time each week to discuss the readings with your classmates. You will be expected to identify specific passages, paragraphs, or sentences that you feel are interesting, effective, or important, or that you may have questions about. You will then prepare a written response to that week’s reading, reflective of the theme of this course (3-5 paragraphs, written twice a week). To make things interesting, I will ask you to create a reading blog (online) where you can post your reactions, thoughts, questions, connections, and weekly responses.
  • Conferences: Instead of tests, I will meet with you either individually or in small groups in order to assess your progress with and understanding of the assigned readings. Again, there is no way you will be able to pass this class without completing the assigned readings.
  • Mid-term Paper: From a list of topics that will later be provided to you by your teacher, you will compose a 5-7 page, TNR font, typed, double-spaced, one-sided, MLA/APA/CMS formatted, essay that reflects your understanding of the course themes and readings.
  • End of Semester Project: Instead of an exam or final paper, I am offering you the opportunity to be creative – consider your reactions to and ideas about the literature and themes of this course and create some kind of project (video, artwork, poster, etc). The project is the culmination of your learning and represents your understanding of the course themes. Projects may be undertaken individually or in groups of no more than 3 people. If working in groups, more will be expected of you.
  • Book of Poetry: You will complete approximately 20 poems by the end of the semester. You will choose your favorite 10 and create a book of poetry. You will need to be creative here as white paper and 3-ring binders just won’t do. Consider crafting the actual book yourself; hint: the dollar store has lots of great materials to help you put a book together if you’re on a budget! You should also try to incorporate images that you feel strongly illustrate the themes of your poetry. You will begin your book with a table of contents and a Foreword/Introduction that explains 1) your approach to/understanding of poetry; 2) short explanations of each poem chosen; and 3) a brief comment as to how these poems reflect your own heroic journey. You will end your book with a Conclusion/Epilogue that summarizes what you have learned through the poetic process and as a result of the final poetry project.
  • Reflective Letters (2): Your reflective letters (your teacher is your audience) will be typed, posted to your blogs, and printed. You will think about your progress throughout the semester and discuss your conclusions. You may make suggestions for future courses, comment on specific assignments or components in the course, reflect on your progress, etc. (Letter 1: three to five paragraphs; Letter 2: seven to ten paragraphs).
  • TESTS: You will have approximately 10 un-announced tests throughout the semester. Failing three or more tests will automatically result in a lowering of your final grade by one full letter.

The WritingCenter: Please remember that IUP has an incredibleWritingCenter located in Eicher Hall. http://www.wc.iup.edu/ They have walk-in times throghout the week and can assist you in a number of ways. Please consider visiting theWritingCenter if you’re feeling anxious or stressed about your writing for this class. They will not help you with grammar, punctuation, etc, but they will help you to organize your thoughts, plan your essays, and develop your ideas! And best of all, it’s FREE!

Plagiarism Statement:

Unacknowledged borrowing of ideas, facts, phrases, wordings, or whole words in a paper, as well as the copying of another Students’ work all constitute plagiarism and are unacceptable in the university community. Students turning in plagiarized work may receive a failing grade for the essay or for the entire course. For more information, see the university policy on plagiarism in your student handbook, or ask me. We will also be discussing this topic more in class. (Schragel, 2006, Plagiarism statement)

Schragel, J. (2006). English 101 syllabus. Retrieved August 20th, 2007, from http://www.people.iup.edu/gxzl/ENGL101.htm

Attendance and Participation: You are expected to attend all scheduled classes.

  • When you are absent, you will email your instructor before class and inform him of your absence and the reason for this absence. In addition, you will state the name and email address of the student you will contact to ask about what you missed due to your absence. You will then email that student (and cc your instructor) to inquire about missed work. I will not contact you abous missed work or conferences.
  • It is completely your responsibility to complete all assignments by their due date, whether you are present in class or not. LATE WORK FOR ANY REASON WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Period. Done Deal. No questions asked. No excuses. No discussion.
  • More than three absences FOR ANY REASON may result in a lowering of your final grade.

Participation is defined (but is not limited to) as follows:

  1. Being prepared for class (supplies, texts, etc)
  2. Actively participating during class activities
  3. Completing all assignments (including readings) by their due dates;
  4. Asking and answering questions during discussions and volunteering your thoughts
  5. Showing up to class on time and being ready to work when your instructor begins class.
You will write your points and track your grades on your student sheet at the end of each class. Your instructor will hand these out to you at the beginning of each class, and collect them at the end of class. You may not take your student sheets home. You may give yourself one point for showing up to class. You may then give yourself one more point for completing the above (1-5). If you felt you were a truly outstanding student during that specific class, you may award yourself one additional point. Maximum daily participation points: 3 pts.

Revision and Extra Credit:

  • Extra credit assignments will be considered on a case by case basis. Please see your instructor for more information.
  • This course is designed so that all students, if they successfully complete the required assignments, can earn the maximum points.
Evaluation:
  • Reflective Responses (Blog entries): 150 pts (10 pts each x 15; full points awarded if completed as assigned)
  • Reflective Comments on Blogs: 50 pts (2pts each x 25)
  • Tests: 200 pts
  • Synthesis Paper: 100 pts
  • Final Project: 100 pts
  • Poetry Book: 200 pts
  • Reflective Letters: Mid-term, 25 pts; Final, 100 pts
  • Participation and Attendance: 75 pts (3 pts x 25 days)
    A 900-1000 pts; B 800-899 pts; C 700-799 pts; D 600-699 pts; F 599 pts and below

READING LIST 

pathways_to_bliss_thm.jpg
English 121

 awakening_heroes_thm.jpg
English 121

odyssey sm.jpg
English 121
(MARLEN WILL GIVE YOU COPIES OF THIS, YOU DO NOT NEED TO BUY IT)


   sidd sm.jpg
English 121
SIDDHARTHA


color purple sm.jpg
English 121
THE COLOR PURPLE


   trav mer sm.jpg
English 121
TRAVELING MERCIES


 tree_and_leaf.jpg
English 121

  (MARLEN WILL GIVE YOU COPIES OF THIS, YOU DO NOT NEED TO BUY IT)


 

SCHEDULE

9/16 Week 4a – Course Introduction

  • In-class activity: What is a hero? Re-visit: What is a poem?
  • Homework:
    • ****Set up and design your blog. You’ll find a guide to help you by clicking here.
    • YOUR BLOG USERNAME SHOULD BE YOUR FIRST & LAST NAME AND YOUR 4 LETTER IUP I.D.
      e.g. John Smith XFDG
      So….your blog address will be http://johnsmithxfdg.wordpress.com
    • NEXT…Go to MANAGE in your dashboard, and then click PAGES. Click on ABOUT and then replace the default text with a 2-3 paragrpah description of yourself. Please also upload a photo and insert it at the top of the page.
    • FINALLY…Go to MANAGE in your dashboard, and then click LINKS. Click on WORDPRESS.COM and replace it with a link to a website you personally enjoy. Do the same for WORPDRESS.ORG. Then go to WRITE in your dashboard, and then click LINKS. Add three (3) more links, for example, your MySpace page, your Facebook page, etc.
    • BLOG ENTRY #1: Consider a person, either real or fictional, living or deceased, who you consider to be a hero. Answer the following questions in 3-5 paragraphs on your blog: 1) Who is this person? In a few sentences, introduce your hero. 2) What makes him or her a hero? 3) Briefly describe your hero’s journey: How did they become a hero; where did they start; what challenges did they face? Feel free to add an image or photo in your blog.
    • POEM #1: How are you feeling about this class? Create a poem that reflects where you are emotionally or psychologically right now. Post it to your blog.
    • If you haven’t yet, take the ARCHETYPE TEST
    • READING:  STAR WARS ORIGINS, and A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO THE HERO WITH A THOUSAND FACES
9/18 Week 4b – Course Introduction, cont’d.
  • In-class discussion: The Epic Poem, introduction to The Odyssey
  • Homework:
    • Finish setting up and designing your blogs.
    • If you haven’t already, please complete Blog Entry #1.
    • POEM #2: Consider Frost’s THE ROAD NOT TAKEN (click me), and reflect on the beginning of a journey that you’ve taken (e.g., perhaps a time when you left some place old to go to some place new). Create a reflective poem on this theme. Post it to your blog.
    • READING: MONOMYTHMYTHWEB Background and Books 1-8; THE ODYSSEY (just the first two sections on the origins of mythology and Homer, stop at "Ch. 22"); ARCHETYPES 101

    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!



9/23 Week 5a  – THE ODYSSEY and Introduction to the Monomyth
  • BLOG REVIEW – pages? posts? photos? links? comments? IUP mail?
  • In-class activity: Joseph Campbell (Power of Myth), Jungian archetypes (class powerpoint: Created by a teacher from Robeson County Schools, North Carolina; retrieved 9/20/08 from http://www.robeson.k12.nc.us/101420102781640763/lib/101420102781640763/Archetypes.ppt) , and the Monomyth
  • Homework:
    • BLOG ENTRY #2: In 3-5 paragraphs, discuss your understanding of the archetypes and monomyth. Feel free to discuss the results of your Archetype Test or the test itself. Use quotes from your readings to help you, and remember to cite your work properly (APA or MLA in-text citations and a Works Cited/Reference list).
    • POEM #3: Create a poem that reflects where you are in your current monomythic journey.
    • READING: MYTHWEB Books 9-16; THE ODYSSEY Ch. 2; Check out TYPES OF POETRY
REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!
9/25 Week 5b – THE ODYSSEY
  • We’ll watch excerpts from The Odyssey in class.
  • Homework:
    • POEMS #4, #5: Create two more poems – one poem will be about a time when you set out on a journey and failed, the other about a time when you set out on a journey and succeeded. Post them to your blog.
    • READING: MYTHWEB Books 17-24; THE ODYSSEY Ch. 23; AWAKENING THE HEROES WITHIN (Introduction, How to Use, and Part I); Check out a few more poetry types from SHADOWPOETRY
REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!

    9/30 Week 6a –  The Monomyth: Departure; Discussion of Archetypes
    • We’ll watch excerpts from The Odyssey in class.
    • In-class activity: The Call
    • Homework:
      • BLOG ENTRY #4: In 3-5 paragraphs, discuss "the call" as it figures in both The Odyssey and The Painted Veil. What do you make of this? Have you ever experienced "a call" in your own life? Be as personal and use as many real life examples as possible.
      • POEM #6: Consider the following poems by British writer, John Masefield (click me) – "Sea-Fever" – and American writer, Edna St. Vincent Millay (click me) – "Departure" – and then compose a poem that reflects today’s topic, "The Call". Use SHADOWPOETRY to help you choose a style you have not yet tried.
      • TAKE THE HEROIC MYTH INDEX in Awakening the Heroes Within
      • READING: AWAKENING, Part I p. 25-68; PATHWAYS, Chapter I
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!
    10/2 Week 6b – The Monomyth: Departure
    • In-class activity: The Refusal
    • Homework:
      • BLOG ENTRY #5: In 3-5 paragraphs, dicuss a time when you refused a call and explain how you changed your mind from not wanting, to wanting to answer the call.
      • POEM #7: Find an image that relates to today’s discussion "The Refusal", and compose a poem that reflects what you see in the image. Save the image to your computer and then upload it into your blog post to accompany your poem. Use SHADOWPOETRY to help you choose a style you have not yet tried.
      • READING: AWAKENING, Part II p. 69-120; Chinese Folktale: THE MAGIC BROCADE (click EXCERPT to get to the story…stop complaining, it’s really short and easy to read); PATHWAYS,  Chapter II
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!


    10/7 Week 7a –  The Monomyth: Departure; Discussion of Archetypes
    • In-class activity: Supernatural Aid
    • Homework:
      • Read the following explanation, take a look at the links below and then take a stab at the homework on your own:
        "Once on the hero’s journey, the hero will come across some form of supernatural aid.

        Campbell stated: “For those who have not refused the call, the first encounter of the hero-journey is with a protective figure (often a little old crone or old man) who provides the adventurer with amulets against the dragon forces he is about to pass.” (p. 69)

        There are many examples of the protective figure that helps the hero. While the herald who extended the call to adventure may also provide this role, it is not always the case. In Star Wars, Obi-wan Kenobi calls Luke to the adventure AND provides him his father’s lightsaber. However, in the Lord of the Rings, Gandalf was the herald to the adventure, but it was Bilbo who gave Frodo the chain-mail shirt made of the fictional metal “mithril” and the Elven dagger, named “Sting.”

        Other characters that are often found providing this help. Campbell also said:

        “In fairy lore it may be some little fellow of the wood, some wizard, hermit, shepherd, or smith, who appears, to supply the amulets and advice that the hero will require. The higher mythologies develop the role in the great figure of the guide, the teacher, the ferryman, the conductor of souls to the afterworld. In classical myth this is Hermes-Mercury; in Egyptian, usually Thoth (the ibis god, the baboon god); the Christian, the Holy Ghost.” (p. 71-73)

        From http://www.mythshow.com/2006/12/01/mythshow-04-monomyth-separation-defined/

        Now consider these:
        http://youtube.com/watch?v=IvcTI3ctK8o&feature=related
        http://youtube.com/watch?v=44XOKr8kips&feature=related
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cAyPJkiQAk

        Consider Hermes’ role in Chapter 10 of the Odyssey .

      • BLOG ENTRY #6: Discuss a time when you experienced "supernatural aid". 3-5 pargraphs
      • POEM #8: Find an object that you feel brings you some form of comfort or aid. Compose a poem that reflects this object. Bring this object to class on Thursday (or an image of it if the object is unavailable). Use SHADOWPOETRY to help you choose a style you have not yet tried.
      • READING: PATHWAYS Chapter III.
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!
    10/9 Week 7b – The Monomyth: Departure
    • In-class activity: Crosssing the First Threshold
    • Homework:
      • BLOG ENTRY #7: Discuss your understanding of thresholds giving examples from literature, definitions, etc to back up your definition.
      • POEM #9: Create a poem that reflects a time in your life when you crossed a threshold. Use SHADOWPOETRY to help you choose a style you have not yet tried.
      • READING: AWAKENING Part III; PATHWAYS Chapter IV 
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!

    10/14 Week 8a – The Monomyth: Departure

    • In-class activity: Belly of the Whale
    • Homework:
      • BLOG ENTRY #8: Discuss your understanding of the Belly of the Whale archetype. Find and explain a definition of this stage and then give one example from your own life, and one example from something we’ve read so far this semester.
      • POEM #10: Poem reflecting the Belly of the Whale archetype.  Use SHADOWPOETRY to help you choose a style you have not yet tried.
      • READING: SIDDHARTHA (p. 1-12 "The Brahmin’s Son"); Pathways Chapter V
      • MIDTERM REFLECTIVE LETTER DUE ON 10/16 – Please print this and give it to your instructor and also post it to your blog on its own unique page. You should consider what you’ve accomplished and what you’ve learned; reflect on the course structure, readings, activities, or instructor; state your goals (what you hope to get out of this class, besides a specific grade); or offer feedback/suggestions for improvement in your own performance or your instructor’s. 1-2 pages, or as much as you feel like writing!
      • YOUR MIDTERM PAPER WILL BE DUE OCTOBER 30. . Please post your story to your blog on its own unique page. Write it in Word first and then paste it into your blog. 5-7 pages, APA or MLA formatted, double-spaced.
        LATE PAPERS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED!!!!!!!!!! Your paper will be graded based on the following: 1) Does it address the themes of the course? 2) Does it consider the course readings and discussions? 3) Is there clear evidence that the writing is your best effort (free of grammatical/spelling/formatting errors)? 4) Does it meet the length requirement? 5) Is your paper free of plagiarism (have you properly used in-text citations, reference/works cited lists, quotes, etc?)
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!
    10/16 Week 8b – The Monomyth: Stage 2: Initiation
    • In-class activity: Road of Trials
    • Homework:
      • BLOG ENTRY #9: What is "limen" and what is this term’s significance to this course? 3-5 paragraphs
      • POEM #11, #12: The Road of Trials: Consider the challenges in Stage 2 of the monomyth and compose poems (2) on themes of 1) temptation from the path and 2) sticking to your path.
      • READING: SIDDHARTHA (pp. 13-62, "With the Samanas", "Gotama", "Awakening", and "Kamala"); PATHWAYS Chapter VI.
      • YOUR MIDTERM PAPER WILL BE DUE OCTOBER 30.
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!

    10/21 Week 9a – – Goddess/Temptress

    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!
    10/23 Week 9b – Atonement with the Father

    • In-class activity: Discussion of Samsara, Road of Trials, and Father archetypes
    • Homework:
      • BLOG ENTRY #11: What is your understanding of samsara and how has this principle been active in your life? 3-5 paragraphs
      • POEM #14: Examine the following 10 images and based on our discussions and readings, create a poem that reflects your understanding of the Father archetype.
        Zeus
        Bill Cosby
        The Pope
        Tribal Leader
        Surgeon
        The Wizard of Oz
        Odysseus
        Jesus Christ
        George Bush, Jr.
        Buddha
      • READING: Siddhartha (pp. 101-152 "The Ferryman", "The Son", "Om" & "Govinda").
      • YOUR MIDTERM PAPER WILL BE DUE OCTOBER 30.
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!

     
    10/28 Week 10a – Apotheosis
    • In-class activity: Discuss apotheosis in all of the readings thus far; discuss Siddhartha
    • Homework:
      • BLOG #12: Discuss and explain a specific incidence of apotheosis in your own life, 3-5 paragraphs.
      • POEMS #15: Create a two-part poem that reflect on the event discussed in Blog #12 – one part should reflect your consciousness before the apotheosis, and the other should reflect your consciousness after the apotheosis.
      • READING: The Color Purple (pp. 1-19, stop at "Two of his sister") Read Trudier Harris’s Criticism of The Color Purple: On the Color Purple, Stereotypes, and Silence.
      • YOUR MIDTERM PAPER WILL BE DUE OCTOBER 30.
    10/30 Week 10b – The Ultimate Boon

    • In-class activity: Discussion of the burden of knowledge and heroism
    • Homework:
      • BLOG#13: Heroes of History writes: "With the new knowledge the hero acquired in his apotheosis, he now wishes to share it with the rest of mankind. Usually, the knowledge the hero obtains is related to immortality, where an indestructible life continues after the death of the body." In 3-5 paragraphs discuss the knowledge that you alone have that can be shared with the world. Do you share it? Why or why not?
      • POEM #16: Craft a poem on the theme of "The Ulimtate Boon".
      • READING:The Color Purple (pp. 20-71, stop at "The first week, nobody come"; AWAKENING, Part IV, pp 179-192.
      • BEGIN THINKING ABOUT YOUR FINAL PROJECTS!!! Remember, you can work individually, in pairs, or in groups of no more than three people. Your project must be 3-5 minutes ONLY! Come to class next week with a single sheet of paper that lists the following:
        1) The names of the people in your group/your partner/your name
        2) The title/topic of your project
        3) 1-2 paragraphs describing exactly what you’re going to do and what equipment you will need (computer, cd player, dvd player, etc).
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!
     


    11/4 Week 11a – Watch Jesus Christ Superstar
    Homework:

    • READING: The Color Purple (pp. 72-145, stop at "Us sleep like sisters"); AWAKENING, Part IV, pp 193-208.
    11/6 Week 11b – Watch Jesus Christ Superstar
    Homework:

    • READING: Black Jesus; The Color Purple (pp.164-210, stop at "So what is it like in Memphis"); AWAKENING, Part V  pp 209-232. 
    REMEMBER THAT YOU COULD HAVE A TEST AT ANY TIME! FAILING 3 OR MORE TESTS WILL RESULT IN A FULL LETTER GRADE DEDUCTION FROM YOUR FINAL GRADE IN THIS CLASS!

    The remainder of this course will follow a decidedly different approach. Each day you’ll spend the first 30 minutes meeting in a different small group. You’ll need to firmly explain the stage of the monomyth that we’ll be discussing that day (so know it before you come to class), decide on a theme for your blog entry for that night, and decide on your themes for your poems for that night. You’ll also need to identify quotes, passages, characters, situations, etc from your current and previous readings (and/or literature that you personally have read) that illustrate the themes of that day’s monomythic stage.

    Each group will have a note-taker who will record the contents of that day’s discussion. The note-taker will email his/her notes to the group and all group members will post these notes on their blogs. The ramifications of this approach is that you will need to have an understanding of that day’s monomythic stage BEFORE you come to class. This approach will help you get to know other people in the class better, allow you to more deeply discuss the literature you are reading, and transfer the responsibility for explaining course themes from the instructor to the students.

    Additionally, each student must find a poem (whatever that means to you; an actual poem, a sonnet, song lyrics, an original poem, etc) that reflects each stage that we’ll discuss. This poem will also be posted on the blog. You may also bring in images, photos, etc that help you illustrate your understanding of that day’s theme (please also post these to your blogs).

    After the small group meeting, we’ll meet as a large group and share highlights of our individual group discussions. During this time, your instructor will further elaborate on that day’s theme to help clarify understandings of both the literature and theory.

    • Please check the syllabus before each class to learn which group you’re in.
    • Remember to bring a poem that reflects that day’s stage; post it to your blog.
    • Remember to decide on a note-taker.
    • Remember to decide on a blog theme.
    • Remember to decide on poetry themes.
    • Note-taker: Remember to email your notes to group members.
    • Remember to post your group’s notes to your blog.
    • Research the monomythic stage BEFORE coming to class so that you are prepared to discuss it in your group.
    • Remember to discuss specific examples from the literature.

     


    11/11 Week 12a – Refusal of the Return; The Magic Flight

    Homework:

    11/13 Week 12b – Rescue; Crossing of the Return Threshold
    Homework:
    • POEM #17:
    • READING: The Color Purple (finish the book); AWAKENING Part VI pp 233-256

     


     

    11/18 Week 13a – Master of Two Worlds

    Homework:

    11/20 Week 13b –Freedom to Live
    Today we’ll review all the necessary parts of the poetry book and create a schedule for the final presentations.
    Homework:
    • POEM #18:
    • READING: Traveling Mercies – Choose one story each from Part One, Two, and Three (3 stories total); AWAKENING Part V pp 273-297



    11/25 & 11/27 Week 14
    – THANKSGIVING BREAK

    Homework:

    • POEMS #19, #20:
    • BLOG #16: 3-5 paragraphs about the connections you are making between LaMott’s stories and the Hero’s Journey & novels read earlier in class.
    • READING: Traveling Mercies – Choose one story each from Part 4, 5, and 6 (3 stories total) ; PATHWAYS: Chapter VII, Dialogues



    12/2 Week 15a
    – Final Presentations

    Homework:

    12/4 Week 15b – Final Presentations

    POETRY BOOKS DUE; REFLECTIVE LETTER DUE ON BLOG; FINAL CLASS PARTY!


     

    NO FINAL EXAM!

    Have a great winter and I wish you joy and wonder as you continue on your own heroic journeys.

     


    Here are some videos to help get you in the mood….
    …what do they all have in common?
    (click each person below to view video)


    188heroscript_example.jpg

     

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