Marlen and students publish research in new Language Learning in Higher Education

Image from http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/cerclesAfter two years and numerous revisions (and rejections), Marlen and his Finnish students have finally found a home for their research manuscript, Bridging passion and profession: Supporting agency and investment in multilingual university writers.” The journal Language Learning in Higher Education – edited by the renowned David Little of Trinity College, Dublin – is the newly founded, double-blind per-reviewed journal of the prestigious European Confederation of Language Centres in Higher Education and is dedicated to disseminating the best results of research activities carried out at language centres and higher education departments. Marlen’s manuscript is co-authored by no less than seven of his students from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland: Maiju Uusipaikka, Annika Karinen, Tanja Räsänen, Diana Raitala, Reetta Ellonen, Hanna Huumonen and Otto Tuomela. The abstract follows:

Throughout the last two decades, scholarship discussing learner development and autonomy has expanded from viewing the learner as one who possesses intrinsic or extrinsic motivation to a performer who to varying degrees invests as an agent in the learning process, particularly when able to pursue her or his passions. With this expansion in mind, the authors sought to look back at the trajectory of their experiences in a second language communication and composition course in order to more deeply understand the roles of agency and investment in their own and fellow classmates’ learning. As such, this research examines the role of project-based learning activities that attempt to bridge the learners’ personal passions and professional interests. Seven student-researchers reported via written narrative how such a bridging approach in the multilingual writing environment supported learner investment and agency. Student responses speak to the need for a stronger sense of connection among their disciplinary studies, personal interests, and even instructors, and highlight the ways in which investment and agency are associated with ideas about learner affect, learner identity, learner autonomy and language acquisition.

Advertisements

Marlen and students publish research in new Language Learning in Higher Education

Image from http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/cerclesAfter two years and numerous revisions (and rejections), Marlen and his Finnish students have finally found a home for their research manuscript, Bridging passion and profession: Supporting agency and investment in multilingual university writers.” The journal Language Learning in Higher Education – edited by the renowned David Little of Trinity College, Dublin – is the newly founded, double-blind per-reviewed journal of the prestigious European Confederation of Language Centres in Higher Education and is dedicated to disseminating the best results of research activities carried out at language centres and higher education departments. Marlen’s manuscript is co-authored by no less than seven of his students from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland: Maiju Uusipaikka, Annika Karinen, Tanja Räsänen, Diana Raitala, Reetta Ellonen, Hanna Huumonen and Otto Tuomela. The abstract follows:

(more…)

One Comment Add yours

  1. Paul Doyle says:

    Combining different study areas and not closely related thoughts is to my mind determining for each learning process, language learning included. Especially in higher education, different scientific majors can be easily connected with language courses. Instead of visiting a general language course, how about a Spanish course for engineers or Russian for historians? This is my usual advice for students. I’m very eager to read the journal and see what else can be applied to maximize the language learning effect in higher education.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s