AUM Composition 1

5-senses-1

ENGLISH COMPOSITION THROUGH THE 5 SENSES*

(*is there a 6th?)

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 1, 101-03 MWF 1-2:20pm

Instructor: Marlen Elliot Harrison, MA, PhD

About the Instructor: www.MarlenHarrison.com

Office and hours: M/W 2:20-3pm

Phone: +356 7923 0466; Whatsapp +1 202 780 8047

Email: marlen.harrison@aum.edu.mt

AUM Website: http://aum.edu.mt

Writing Center, MTW 3-5pm, 1st floor lounge: http://aumwc.wordpress.com

 

5 Senses [Online image]. (n.d.). Retrieved June 12, 2017 from https://www.thebusyqueenbee.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/5-senses.png


SYLLABUS

9/20 Week 1a – Introductions and “What is I?”
Today we will get to know each other and do some in-class reading and writing.

  • 1a-1 IN-CLASS WRITING: Senses activity (10 minutes)
  • 1a-2 IN-CLASS READING: What Is I? (10 minutes)

Homework for 2a 9/25:

  • 1a-3 WRITING: Ungraded diagnostic essay (25 minutes). Consider Kawai’s discussion about “What is I?” and respond to this question – “What is I?”. This paper will help me better understand your writing style and needs. Please type this on your computer and bring it to class on Monday.
    • AUDIENCE: Instructor
    • GENRE: Personal response essay
    • LENGTH: 2 pages, double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 pt font, 1″ margins.
  • 1a-4 READING & RESPONSE – Literacy Narratives, Part 1: Respond to each essay below with 2 paragraphs of writing. The first paragraph should be a summary of what you read; the second paragraph should be your own interpretation or reaction to the reading. Please make sure you are using a dictionary (for example http://dictionary.com) to help you with any words you don’t know. Please type this on your computer and bring it to class on Monday. Here is an example of one student’s reading responses as an example of what I am expecting:

 

9/25 Week 2a

HOMEWORK FOR 2b

  • 1a-3 REVISE WRITING: Ungraded diagnostic essay (25 minutes). Consider Kawai’s discussion about “What is I?” and respond to this question – “What is I?”. This paper will help me better understand your writing style and needs. Please type this on your computer and bring it to class on Monday.
    • AUDIENCE: Instructor
    • GENRE: Personal response essay
    • LENGTH: 2 pages, double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 pt font, 1″ margins.
  • 1a-4 READING & RESPONSE – Literacy Narratives, Part 1: Respond to each essay below with 2 paragraphs of writing. The first paragraph should be a summary of what you read; the second paragraph should be your own interpretation or reaction to the reading. Please make sure you are using a dictionary (for example http://dictionary.com) to help you with any words you don’t know. Please type this on your computer and bring it to class on Monday. Here is an example of one student’s reading responses as an example of what I am expecting:


Week 2b – Literacy Narratives
Today we will discuss the reading homework and review website set-up. We will also be introduced to the first major writing assignment, a literacy narrative.

  • 2a-1 IN-CLASS READING & DISCUSSION ABOUT LITERACY & LANGUAGE (reading response not needed)
  • 2a-2 GOAL-SETTING (FOR LITERACY NARRATIVE): Start a new page on your website titled LITERACY NARRATIVE. Here you will begin this essay with pre-writing goals (and later you will add post-writing reflections).
  • 2a-3 IN-CLASS WRITING/MIND MAP: Begin the invention process for your own literacy narrative and add it to your LITERACY NARRATIVE PAGE.

Homework for 2b:

  • 2a-4 READING & RESPONSE – Literacy Narratives, Pt 2.: Respond to each essay below with 2 paragraphs of writing. The first paragraph should be a summary of what you read; the second paragraph should be your own interpretation or reaction to the reading. Please make sure you are using a dictionary (for example http://dictionary.com) to help you with any words you don’t know. Share this on your blog as a POST, titled READING RESPONSE 1a. Here is an example of one student’s reading responses as an example of what I am expecting:
  • 2a-5 WRITING: LITERACY NARRATIVE ASSIGNMENT
    • Post to your website on your LITERACY NARRATIVE page.
    • OBJECTIVES: First, this assignment is designed to give you an opportunity to work on narrative writing. Second, it should serve as a catalyst to a reflective investigation into your background as a reader and writer. Third, it will help me and others interested in teaching learn about the kinds of events you experienced that you believe had an impact on the kind of literate person you are today.
    • READING AND CONTEXT:  For this assignment, consider a literacy event as any event that loosely involves reading or writing—not necessarily in school. This may be the learning of new and meaningful vocabulary, the writing of a story or essay, a particular reading experience, reading or writing interactions with parents, friends, teachers, or other students.
    • ASSIGNMENT: Write a 3-4 page essay (double-spaced, 12 pt font, Times New Roman) in which you describe a literacy event or experience— positive or negative—from your past.  The event can come from your experience in school or in the world outside; it may be something you experienced in your early life, or it can be something you’ve encountered recently.  Use the readings as models, particularly for vividness of description and manner of reflection.
    • FORM: The essay should accomplish two tasks: narrative and reflection
      • Narrative: A narrative is a story.  Because this is an assignment that must explain the event to others–me, your classmates (immediate audience), and teachers and other adults (ultimate audience), you will need to narrate the experience as fully and as richly as possible. Your essay should be filled with concrete and specific details. Furthermore, “literacy events” do not take place in a void; they are always part of some larger experience. Pay attention to the larger experience.  Include, as appropriate, descriptions of the particulars of the experience:  setting, characters (people involved), dialogue, background, and drama. Consider your 5 senses and how you may use them to create rich, descriptive prose. You may also consider your response to Kawai’s “What Is I” in terms of thinking about who you are and how you conceptualize identity.
      • Reflection: Your essay should also reflect on why this event was (or is) of such importance and offer an explanation or evaluation. For example, you might consider what kind of impact this experience had on your attitudes toward reading or writing. How did it affect you as a person? How would you rate its long-term effects? What impact might this have on others in similar situations? In other words, the reflection should try to answer the question: So what? The reflection portion is your claim; the narrative is your evidence.
    • TARGET AUDIENCE: Teachers, administrators, even politicians with an education agenda who want to learn how literacy experiences have affected students, positively or negatively. So this will be an adult audience, but you’re the one with the most recent experience. You’re the expert.
    • GENRE: Narrative
    • DUE DATES: Rough drafts are due on Wednesday, 2b. Final drafts are due on Monday 3a.
    • INCLUSIONS: Make sure you include on your LITERACY NARRATIVE page:
      • Pre-writing goals: Write 3-5 goals reflecting what you want to accomplish in this essay. The goals may reflect the instructions for the assignment or may be your own personal goals for improving your writing, experimenting with new language or forms of grammar, etc.
      • Post-writing reflections: When finished, reflect on your progress towards the goals you set prior to writing. How did you do?
      • Any written or recorded invention activities you performed for this essay.

 

9/27 Week 2b – Literacy Narrative Drafts
You will bring your rough drafts to class for peer review. Upon completion of the peer review activity, you will write a short explanation of what you did in the peer review, including how you feel about your draft afterwards, with specifics on what you plan to do to revise (new pre-writing goals for your final draft). Based on peer feedback, you will revise your drafts and post revisions to your website LITERACY NARRATIVE page just under your draft (and goals/inventions).

Homework for 3a:

  • 2b-4 READING & RESPONSE: Respond to each essay below with 2 paragraphs of writing. The first paragraph should be a summary of what you read; the second paragraph should be your own interpretation or reaction to the reading. Please make sure you are using a dictionary (for example http://dictionary.com) to help you with any words you don’t know. Share this on your blog as a POST, titled READING RESPONSE 1a. Here is an example of one student’s reading responses as an example of what I am expecting:
  • 2b-5 REVISION OF LITERACY NARRATIVE
    • Based on the feedback you received from your classmate, create new pre-writing goals and revise your essay. Be sure to perform any invention activities as necessary and when the project is complete, include your post-writing reflections.
  • 2b-6 SELF-ASSESSMENT ON ESSAY: When you have completed your first major writing assignment, answer the following questions and include them on your LITERACY NARRATIVE webpage.
    • How much time (about) did you spend planning this paper? (Include reading, note-taking, invention, brainstorming, outlining, etc.)  Explain what you did.
    • How much time did you spend drafting? Revising?
    • What do you believe are the strengths of this paper? On what levels does it work well?
    • What do you think are the weaknesses in the paper? What might you do differently or change in this paper if you had more time?
    • What do you want a reader to think or understand after having read this paper? (This should be something he or she didn’t already know.)
    • What kind of feedback would you like me to give on your paper? If you ultimately decide to revise this for your portfolio, how can I help?
  • 2b-7 SUBMIT FINAL DRAFT by 12:59PM Monday of week 3

    • Compile all of your inventions, your first draft with pre-writing goals and post-writing reflection, final draft with pre-writing and post-writing reflection, and self-assessment (2b-6) and submit this in a single file (e.g. Microsoft Word document) to our course’s ASSIGNMENTS section, LITERACY NARRATIVE. We will have time in class on Friday (2c) to further discuss your draft in progress.

 

9/29 Week 2c – ENGLISH WRITING WORKSHOP
Today we will consider your questions and the challenges you’ve faced thus far in your English writing.

  • 2c-1 WORKSHOP: PROPER USAGE
    • Create a new post titled ENGLISH WRITING REVIEW and take notes about today’s examples of language/grammar being used correctly. You may also add links to helpful resources here so that you can come back to them later.
      • If you still have questions, please visit the GRAMMAR/LANGUAGE QUESTIONS forum in DISCUSSIONS here in our course and post your questions there. I will respond accordingly.

Homework for 3a:

 

10/2 Week 3a – Writing in a particular genre: The Review

Why a review? A review is a genre that is used both inside academia and outside.  It is also a genre that has specific components that vary according to the target audience, where it appears, and the general context.  The goal here is to understand how genre is impacted by readers, purposes, and contexts, and how these, in turn motivate style choices

  • 3a-1 UNDERSTANDING THE REVIEW ASSIGNMENT
    • Create a new PAGE on your website titled REVIEW.
    • OBJECTIVES:  We are now turning to a different genre:  the review.  We’ll be analyzing the review as a genre, and then you’ll write your own. This project will help us understand how writing takes different forms and how content and style are dictated by form.
    • ASSIGNMENT:  This assignment has two parts. You will first analyze examples of this genre to help you better understand it and then write a two-three page positive, negative, or mixed opinion review (double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 pt font, 1″ margins. Please be sure to properly cite quoted text in the style – MLA, APA, CMS – of your choice). You may review anything you wish, e.g. a new film, athletic team, museum, music release, perfume/cologne, fashion collection, website, television program, restaurant, etc. modeled after sample reviews you find online or in a newspaper/magazine. Let your 5 senses be your guide!
    • FORM:  The essay should have two parts: analysis of genre and actual review.
    • GENRE(S): Analysis AND Review
    • TARGET AUDIENCE:  Who do you feel the target audience is for this review? How does understanding the audience help you with this essay?
    • DUE DATES: Rough drafts are due next week, 4a.  Final drafts are due 4b.

Homework for 3b:

  • 3a-2READING & RESPONSE: In 2 paragraphs for each reading, use your senses to reflect on what you see, think, and feel while connecting the major themes from the reading with your own lived experience. Post this to your blog as a POST, titled READING RESPONSE 3a. Here is an example of one student’s reading responses as an example of what I am expecting:

  • 3a-3 IDENTIFYING EXAMPLES: Identify and read three different examples of the kind of review you wish to create so that you can illustrate models you have reviewed to assist you with this assignment. Please add these links to your REVIEW website page.
  • 3a-4 ANALYZING GENRES: Look at the reviews in terms of the prompts in the guidelines below. Then write up the answers to the prompts on your REVIEW page. These will accompany your review and will serve as a set of notes for your e-portfolio and as a style guide to your draft (indicating audience, tone, format, images, structure, word choice, sentence structure, etc.). Here’s the format for the analysis: List the reviews you looked at; identify the scene and describe the situation of the genre you looked at; identify the patterns of the genre’s features; and analyze what these patterns indicate about the situation and scene.
    • 1) Start here by listing the review examples you chose and briefly explain why you chose them.
    • 2) Identify the Scene and Describe the Situation in which the Genre is Used. For this assignment collect 3 reviews in your chosen genre and subject. Seek answers to the following questions (Adapted from Tardy, Christine. Building Genre Knowledge.  Parlor Press, 2009. 108-110):
      • SETTING:  Where does the genre appear?  How and when is it transmitted and used?  With what other genres does this genre interact? Just as an example, let’s look at my perfume reviews at Fragrantica.com:
        • https://www.fragrantica.com/news/Bargain-Fragrance-Reviews/
        • It appears in an online magazine.
        • It is transmitted via written text with accompanying images. It is broken into various sections with a mixture of concrete evidence and personal claims/opinions. The writer makes recommendations and uses other people’s opinions to accompany his own. It is likely used by readers who are fans of fragrance to help them consider making a purchase.
        • Are there narrative aspects, similar to the literacy narrative assignment in this class? Consider the reading homework; what other genres does this overlap with? Why?
      • SUBJECT:  What topics, issues, ideas, questions, etc. does this genre address (not the actual content of the review but the review genre itself)?
      • PARTICIPANTS:  Who uses this genre?
        • Writers: Who writes the texts in this genre?  Are multiple writers possible?  What roles do they perform?  What characteristics must writers of this genre possess?  Under what circumstances do writers write the genre (e.g., in teams, on a computer, in a rush)?
        • Readers:  Who reads the texts in this genre?  Is there more than one type of reader for this genre?  What characteristics must readers of this genre possess?  Under what circumstances do readers read the genre (e.g., at their leisure, on the run, in waiting rooms)?
      • PURPOSES:  Why do writers write this genre and why do readers read it?  What purposes does the genre fulfill for the people who use it?
    • 3) Identify and Describe Patterns in the Genre’s Features.  What recurrent features do the samples share?  For example, what content is typically included?  What excluded? How is the content treated?  What sorts of examples are used?  What counts as evidence (personal testimony, facts, etc.)?  How are the texts in this genre structured?  What are they parts, and how are they organized?  In what format are texts of this genre presented?  What layout or appearance is common?  How long is a typical text in this genre?  What types of sentences do texts in the genre typically use?  How long are they?  Are they simple or complex, passive or active?  Are the sentences varied? Do they share a certain style?  What diction (types of words) is most comment?  Is a type of jargon used?  Is slang used?  How would you describe the writer’s voice?
    • 4) Analyze what these Patterns Reveal about the Situation and Scene. What do these patterns reveal about the genre, its situation and the scene in which it is used?  What do participants have to know or believe to understand or appreciate the genre?  Who is invited into the genre and who is excluded?  What values, believes, goals, and assumptions are revealed through the genre’s patterns?  What content is considered most important?  What content (topics or details) is ignored?
  • 3a-5 INVENTION: Consider any form of invention that might be useful to you in creating your review and include it on your REVIEW page.
  • 3a-6 FIRST DRAFT OF REVIEW: Considering the guidelines above, create your review. You may incorporate images and video as you wish, making sure to properly cite all media and text that you incorporate.
    • INCLUSIONS: Make sure you include on your REVIEW page:
      • Pre-writing goals and post-writing reflections.
      • Any written or recorded invention activities you performed for this essay.

 

10/4 3b – Peer review of Review assignment; Claims and evidence

Today we will discuss the use of claims and evidence in academic writing. You will also complete peer review on your Review drafts. Upon completion of the peer review activity, you will write a short explanation of what you did in the peer review, including how you feel about your draft afterwards, with specifics on what you plan to do to revise (new pre-writing goals for your final draft). Based on peer feedback, you will revise your drafts and post revisions to your website REVIEW page just under your draft (and goals/inventions).

  • 3b-1 DISCUSSION: CLAIMS AND EVIDENCE (from Writing Analytically, David Rosenwasser and Jill Stephen (Harcourt College Publishers, 2000)
    • A CLAIM is what you want to prove.  It is a point that you make about the meaning of your subject.  The primary claim in a paper is the thesis.
    • EVIDENCE refers to the information that is used to corroborate (support) a claim, though we use the term more broadly to refer to the pool of primary material (data) being analyzed.
      • In all disciplines, it is important to support claims with evidence, to make your evidence lead to claims, and especially to be explicit about how you’ve arrived at the connection between your evidence and your claims. Evidence, rarely if ever, can be left to speak for itself.   Also, the farther away your language gets from concrete references to physical detail—things that you can see, hear, count, taste, smell, and touch—the more abstract it becomes.  A pizza covered with anchovies and red sauce is concrete; the phrase “delicious food” is abstract. Label the following sentences with an “E” (evidence) or a “C” (claim).
      • A. The owners are ruining baseball in America.  Although they claim that they are losing money, they are really just been greedy.  A few years ago, they even fired the commissioner, Fay Vincent, because he took the players’ side.  Baseball is a sport, not a business, and it is a sad fact that it is being threatened by greedy businessmen.
      • B. Baseball is a sport, not a business, and it is a sad fact that it is being threatened by greedy businessmen.  For example, Eli Jacobs, the previous owner of the Baltimore Orioles, recently sold the team to Peter Angelos for $100 million more than he had spent ten years earlier when he purchased it.  Also a new generation of baseball parks has been built for the Orioles in Baltimore, for the White Sox in Chicago, for the Rangers in Arlington, for the Indians in Cleveland.  These parks are enormously expensive and include elaborate scoreboards and luxury boxes.  The average baseball players, meanwhile now earn over a million dollars a year, and they all have agents to represent them.  Barry Bonds, the left fielder for the San Francisco Giants, is paid over $7 million a season.  Sure, he has won the coveted Most Valuable Player award (MVP) in his league three times, but is any ballplayer worth that much money?
    • Evidence:  You have to show how and why the evidence supports the conclusions.  Evidence can almost always be interpreted in more than one way.
    • TWO STEPS TO EXPLAIN YOUR EVIDENCE:
      • State explicitly what you take the details to mean
      • State exactly how the evidence supports or qualifies your claim.
    • The more you examine something, the more you will discover to say about it.
      • Problem: A common problem is insufficiently analyzed evidence about which the writer repeatedly makes the same general claim.
      • Solution:  It is generally better to make ten points on a single representative issue or example (10 on 1) than to make the same basic point about ten related issues or examples.  Use 10 on 1 to:
        • Locate the range of possible meanings your evidence suggests
        • Slow down the hasty move to generalization and thus help to ensure that when you leap to a claim, that claim will be more specific, and better able to account for your evidence.
        • Make you less inclined to cling to your first claim inflexibly, opening the way for you to discover a way of representing more fully the complexity of your subject.
    • Now, examine your review draft and identify 3 claims you make and the kinds of evidence you present to corroborate these claims. Do you see any room for improvement?
  • 3b-2 PEER REVIEW RUBRIC CREATION: Let’s create a rubric specifically for this assignment and make sure to address claims and evidence.
  • 3b-3 PEER REVIEW OF CLASSMATE’S DRAFT:
    • Work together with a classmate to perform peer review of their essay.

Homework for 4b:

  • 3b-4 REVISION OF GENRE ANALYSIS & REVIEW

    • Based on the feedback you received from your classmate, create new pre-writing goals and revise your essay. Be sure to perform any invention activities as necessary and when the project is complete, include your post-writing reflections.
  • 3b-5 SELF-ASSESSMENT ON ESSAY: Now that you have completed your 2nd major writing assignment, answer the following questions and include them on your REVIEW webpage.
    • How much time (about) did you spend planning this paper? (Include reading, note-taking, invention, brainstorming, outlining, etc.)  Explain what you did.
    • How much time did you spend drafting? Revising?
    • What do you believe are the strengths of this review? On what levels does it work well?
    • What do you think are the weaknesses in the review? What might you do differently or change in this paper if you had more time?
    • What do you want a reader to think or understand after having read this review? (This should be something he or she didn’t already know.)
    • What kind of feedback would you like me to give on your review? If you ultimately decide to revise this for your portfolio, how can I help?
  • 3b-6 SUBMIT FINAL DRAFT by 12:59PM Monday of week 4

    • Compile all of your inventions, your first draft with pre-writing goals and post-writing reflection, final draft with pre-writing and post-writing reflection, and self-assessment (3b-5) and submit this in a single file (e.g. Microsoft Word document) to our course’s ASSIGNMENTS section, REVIEW. We will have time in class on Friday (3c) to further discuss your draft in progress.

 

10/6 3c – ENGLISH WRITING WORKSHOP

Today we will consider your questions and the challenges you’ve faced thus far in your English writing.

  • 3c-1 WORKSHOP: PROPER USAGE
    • Open your old post titled ENGLISH WRITING REVIEW and take notes about today’s examples of language/grammar being used correctly. You may also add links to helpful resources here so that you can come back to them later.
      • If you still have questions, please visit the GRAMMAR/LANGUAGE QUESTIONS forum in DISCUSSIONS here in our course and post your questions there. I will respond accordingly.

Homework for 4a:

 

10/9 Week 4a – Composing Process

The primary activity for this week is the exploration of students’ composing processes. The purpose is to help students see how complex and recursive the writing process can be, and also provide them with perspectives on how other people write.

  • 4a-1 CLASS DISCUSSION

    • Start a new page on your website titled COMPOSING. Make some notes about your composing processes as we discuss today’s theme; this can serve as an invention process to aid your next essay (consider the claims you made about your process and the evidence available to corroborate it).

Homework for 4b:

  • 4a-2 WRITING: THEORIZING YOUR COMPOSING PROCESS
    • PURPOSE:  Becoming aware of the process that we use to come up with a topic for any form of writing and the processes and approaches we have for bringing that written text to completion can help us better understand writing in general and our own writing in particular.  The goal of this assignment is to work on coming to terms with “the writing process.”  Many writers have similar problems (such as writer’s block, not allowing sufficient time for revision, lack of development, etc.), while other difficulties may be very individual.  What you learn about your own process may help to understand yourself better as a writer.  This assignment also presents an opportunity to describe a process and analyze it, theorizing about why the process works (or where it falls apart).
    • ASSIGNMENT:  Write a 2-3 page essay (double-spaced, 12 pt font, Times New Roman) describing your composing process. This assignment has two levels.  On the one hand, explore your writing process.  Then try to develop a theory about why your process is as it is. BE SPECIFIC.
    • AUDIENCE: Classmates
    • GENRE: Descriptive AND Expository (why?)
    • Use specific examples of papers and writing experiences such as your writing from this course thus far to illustrate your points as you consider the questions below as a guide. Consider your claims and your evidence in relation to today’s discussion.
    • Feel free to discuss any aspects of the writing process that occur to you; don’t feel limited to the questions below. I am not looking for the quick or obvious answer here. The best responses attempt to analyze what goes on intellectually, psychologically, and emotionally as you grapple with these issues. Once again, consider Hayao Kawai’s discussion of “What Is I?”
      • Do you have a favorite place to write or essential elements that you need as you compose, such as a certain room, a favorite pen?  Do you have particular aversions or addictions to noise, music, television shows, or food?  Why?
      • Do you compose with pen and paper, typewriter, or computer? If you use a word processor, has this changed your writing from the days of pen or pencil and paper?  How does the technology of writing affect what you say and how you say it?
      • Do you have trouble getting started? Do you cross things out and rewrite or write the first draft all the way through?  At what points do you revise?  How would you characterize the types of revisions?
      • What techniques do you use to avoid writing? What seems to be going on psychologically?
      • How do you organize your thoughts? Do you use a prewriting strategy like clustering or outlining?
      • Have you experienced writer’s block? If so, what method do you use to get past it?  Why does this work?
      • How do you feel about writing, about yourself as a writer? Does this help or get in the way when you write?
      • Have you developed a system of writing that works most of the time? Is there any one part of the writing process that is more difficult?
      • How do you feel about throwing a piece of writing out and starting completely over? How do you feel about your end product?  Are you protective or possessive of your work?  Is your writing part of your personal identity?
    • Post this essay to our COMPOSING forum in DISCUSSIONS.
    • Post this to your blog as a PAGE, titled COMPOSING.
    • INCLUSIONS: Make sure you include on your COMPOSING page:
      • Pre-writing goals and post-writing reflections.
      • Any written or recorded invention activities you performed for this essay.

 

10/11 4b – Composing Process continued

You will complete peer review on your Composing drafts. Upon completion of the peer review activity, you will write a short explanation of what you did in the peer review, including how you feel about your draft afterwards, with specifics on what you plan to do to revise (new pre-writing goals for your final draft). Based on peer feedback, you will revise your drafts and post revisions to your website COMPOSING page just under your draft (and goals/inventions).

  • 4b-1 PEER REVIEW RUBRIC CREATION: Let’s create a rubric specifically for this assignment and make sure to address claims and evidence in relation to this being both a descriptive AND an expository essay.
  • 4b-2 PEER REVIEW OF CLASSMATE’S DRAFT:
    • Work together with a classmate to perform peer review of their essay.

Homework for 5a:

  • 4b-3 REVISION OF COMPOSING PROCESS ESSAY

    • Based on the feedback you received from your classmate, create new pre-writing goals and revise your essay. Be sure to perform any invention activities as necessary and when the project is complete, include your post-writing reflections.
  • 4b-4 SELF-ASSESSMENT ON ESSAY: Now that you have completed your 3rd major writing assignment, answer the following questions and include them on your COMPOSING webpage.
    • How much time (about) did you spend planning this paper? (Include reading, note-taking, invention, brainstorming, outlining, etc.)  Explain what you did.
    • How much time did you spend drafting? Revising?
    • What do you believe are the strengths of this review? On what levels does it work well?
    • What do you think are the weaknesses in the review? What might you do differently or change in this paper if you had more time?
    • What do you want a reader to think or understand after having read this review? (This should be something he or she didn’t already know.)
    • What kind of feedback would you like me to give on your review? If you ultimately decide to revise this for your portfolio, how can I help?
  • 4b-5 SUBMIT FINAL DRAFT by 12:59PM Monday of week 5

    • Compile all of your inventions, your first draft with pre-writing goals and post-writing reflection, final draft with pre-writing and post-writing reflection, and self-assessment (4b-4) and submit this in a single file (e.g. Microsoft Word document) to our course’s ASSIGNMENTS section, COMPOSING. We will have time in class on Friday (4c) to further discuss your draft in progress.

 

10/13 4c – ENGLISH WRITING WORKSHOP

Today we will consider your questions and the challenges you’ve faced thus far in your English writing.

  • 4c-1 WORKSHOP: PROPER USAGE
    • Open your old post titled ENGLISH WRITING REVIEW and take notes about today’s examples of language/grammar being used correctly. You may also add links to helpful resources here so that you can come back to them later.
      • If you still have questions, please visit the GRAMMAR/LANGUAGE QUESTIONS forum in DISCUSSIONS here in our course and post your questions there. I will respond accordingly.

Homework for 5a:

  • 4c-2 READING & RESPONSE: In 2 paragraphs for each reading, use your senses to reflect on what you see, think, and feel while connecting the major themes from the reading with your own lived experience. Post this to your blog as a POST, titled READING RESPONSE 4c. Here is an example of one student’s reading responses as an example of what I am expecting:

 

10/16 Week 5 – Midterm Portfolio and Revisions

This marks a point where students should revise some of the work they have done so far and collect it in a portfolio with a reflection on what they feel they have accomplished thus far.  What follows is the Midterm Revision Assignment to provide to students. We will work on this in-class 5a and 5b this week. We will create the rubrics for the portfolio and reflective letter together as a class.

  • 5-1 MIDTERM PORTFOLIO REVISION: In-class discussion and review
    • PURPOSE:  This assignment should represent the best work you have done to this point in the term.  One of the components should be a substantial revision of a previously written draft of an essay – choose from the following:
      • Literacy narrative
      • Review
      • Composing process
    • You should bring the essay as close as you can to a polished, flawless final product.  Revised papers should have:  a clear focus, a presentation that takes a position or makes a point, effective examples in support, a coherent organization, successful opening and closing.  It should also attend to clarity, grammar, spelling, punctuation.  In a word, everything.
    • ASSIGNMENT:  Revise one of the three papers (Literacy Narrative, Review, or Composing Process) that you have written this term.  This does not mean a hasty editing job.  This assignment counts as a separate paper, so it’s a good idea to treat it as such in terms of the time and effort you spend on it.  Furthermore, it represents your first grade in this class. In terms of selection, choose the paper you think has the most potential for a good grade and one that you would be willing to spend another week on.    In addition include several other pieces of informal writing that you feel supports your progress to achieving the learning outcomes (rough drafts, invention activities, reading responses, genre analysis, in-class writing).  Total pages (paper and other materials) should not exceed 10 pages.
    • REFLECTIVE LETTER:  Write a 1 ½ – 2 page reflection on the degree to which your work on the paper you’ve selected meets at least some of the module learning goals for English Composition I. The reflective essay (or letter) is one of the most important essays of the term.  In it, you should discuss the degree to which the materials (especially the formal paper) in the portfolio meet module goals or learning outcomes (see below).  Have some of these goals been met, at least in part?  What remains to be worked on and why?  The reflective letter should make specific reference to evidence in the portfolio to illustrate your claims.
      • GRADING: This paper will be graded according to the rubrics that your instructor provides.  Be sure to proofread this paper before you submit it.
      • DUE DATES: 12:59pm Monday of week 6.
      • LEARNING OUTCOMES
        • Rhetorical Knowledge: By the end of this module, students should be able to demonstrate that they can:
          • Define and focus on a purpose or purposes
          • Interpret and respond to different audiences
          • Respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations
          • Apply conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation
          • Apply appropriate tone, diction, and level of formality
          • Demonstrate how genres shape reading and writing
          • Write in several genres
        • Critical Thinking, Reading and Writing: By the end of this module, students should be able to demonstrate that they can:
          • Employ writing and reading for inquiry, thinking, and communicating
          • Respond and evaluate texts
          • Integrate their own ideas with those of other
        • Processes: By the end of this module, students should to demonstrate that they can:
          • Recognize and articulate the value of using multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text
          • Exhibit flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading
          • Demonstrate understanding that writing is an open process that permits writers to use later invention and re-thinking to revise their work
          • Critique their own and others’ works
        • Knowledge of Conventions: By the end of this module, students should be able to demonstrate that they can:
          • Demonstrate competency in using common formats for different kinds of texts.
          • Apply a variety of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics.
          • Correctly apply in their writing such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling.
    • ASSESSMENT:  The portfolio should be assessed according to the following criteria.
      • Does the student understand at least some of the learning goals of the module and can he/she talk about them competently?
      • Does the evidence in the portfolio support the conclusions/assertions made in the reflective letter?
    • NOTE: A well-written reflective essay with partial or missing support in the portfolio will not receive a high grade, nor will a poorly written reflective letter with good support.

Homework for 6a:

  • TBA

 

Instructor’s Description and Rationale: “Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul” (from The Picture of Dorian Gray). We experience and interpret our worlds in unique ways by employing each of our five senses, sometimes individually, often collaboratively. Likewise, our languages, communities, relationships, and cultures all influence the numerous identities we construct and perform. In this course, students will keep personal websites and develop projects inspired by an examination of both the five senses (is there a sixth?) and linguistic cultures, inquiries that will serve as introductions to the various genres, conventions and structures of English composition and the English-language university system. Such writing will also aid us in a deeper understanding of the ways we experience the world and what we bring to our writing. We’ll begin with a Japanese folktale, as told by Dr. Hayao Kawai, that asks the question “What is I?” and use Andrea Lunsford: The St. Martin’s Handbook, 8th Edition  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. as our main resource text. Through self-directed writing projects; small group and instructor-student discussion; and writing, reading, and revising activities, students will be introduced to discourses of academic writing and achieve a greater understanding of how they come to know themselves and the worlds in which they inhabit.

Catalog Description: TBA


LEARNING OUTCOMES

Competences: At the end of the module/unit the learner will have acquired the responsibility and autonomy to:
a) Be responsible to evaluate the merits of multiple types of texts (in a range of genres) through the application of rhetorical principles.
b) Guide the production of multiple types of texts through rhetorical principles
c) Collaborate with other writers in the production of effective texts

Knowledge: At the end of the module/unit the learner will have been exposed to the following:
a) Multiple and varied reading and writing experiences both in academia and the real world
b) Strategies by which written texts can be analyzed for the purposes of learning and critique
c) Understanding how writers can exploit the writing process to produce effective texts
d) Strategies for critical reading
e) Knowledge about conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation

Skills: At the end of the module/unit the learner will have mastered the following skills:
The learner will be able to:
a) Identify specific features of texts, written or spoken, that cause them to be meaningful, purposeful, and effective for readers and listeners in a given situation
b) Write effectively in at least three different non-fiction prose genres
c) Read critically, identifying the rhetorical elements (ethos, pathos and logos) that make a text effective
d) Reflect on learner’s own writing and evaluate its rhetorical effectiveness
e) Demonstrate competency in using common formats for different kinds of texts
f) Exhibit flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing and proofreading
g) Apply a variety of genre conventions ranging from structure to paragraphing to tone and mechanics.

Judgment Skills and Critical Abilities: The learner will be able to:
a) Analyze and evaluate rhetorical moves in a range of texts (rhetorical analysis)
b) Integrate learner’s own ideas with those of others
c) Assess the effectiveness of one’s own writing as well as that of professional writers
d) Recognize and articulate the value of using multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text

Most importantly, the learner will be able to employ writing and reading for inquiry, thinking and communicating.

 

AUM GEN ED LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Effective written and oral communication skills and the ability to use current technology to create a final written or oral product.
  • Effective use of appropriate tools to access information, evaluate sources, and conduct independent research.
  • A recognition of contributions from multicultural contexts that enhance human experience, and the interdependence of the global community to facilitate coexistence in multicultural environments, and/or a recognition of the historical contexts and variety of artistic forms, the nature and norms of creative processes that shape creative works, and the ability to engage in creative production of original artifacts.

Essentially, this course will prepare you for the various genres and rhetorical situations of college writing while also helping you to better understand your own identity as an academic writer.

WPA Outcomes Statement Adopted Revisions [2014]_0.pdfPreview the documentView in a new window


Required Materials: A laptop computer, an active email account, a notebook, a pen, a highlighter, and a folder in which to keep handouts and other printed matter. You will also need an active internet connection, a web browser ( I recommend Firefox/Mozilla), a word processing program such as Microsoft Word or Apache Open Office, and a personal WordPress (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. blog to serve as your website/online portfolio.

It would be wise to have the following sites bookmarked in your browser (they are also listed in the main menu of this website under RESOURCES). These are my top ten online recommendations to assist you throughout this course:

We will also read the following text; please be green and frugal by purchasing it used or a digital version. I have provided a link to Amazon.com but please shop anywhere you wish. You will need the book within 7 days of the start of classes so purchase it asap.

Class Format: In this class, you will complete numerous individual reading and writing activities; you will also work together in small groups for feedback and discussion. At the beginning of each class (the first 5 minutes), we will review the homework posted to our blogs by our group members and offer comments and questions. We will then spend time reading literature reflective of the week’s theme and then discuss the reading first within our groups and then together as a class. We will meet regularly in small groups of three to review your writing and to discuss any questions you might have. The remainder of the class will be scheduled for writing activities.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted to your WORDPRESS sites. In this way, your site will also double as an online portfolio.

AUM Honor Code: AUM Honor Code.docxPreview the documentView in a new window

(N)etiquette and Respect: All learners should consider and abide by the following (click the links to read more):

Attendance and Participation: You will receive points for every class you attend, based on your communication and participation. These points will be 10% part of your final grade and cannot be made up if lost.

Absences & Lateness: Attendance Policies.docxPreview the documentView in a new window

Policies specific to my course:

  • Late work will receive a 10% deduction for each day late beyond the due date.
  • Let’s face it, everyone thinks that class is boring and quiet when you’re not there, so please try to plan on 100% attendance. More than two absences with the exception of verifiable medical or legal emergencies will result in a lowering of your final grade by 100 points.
  • I worry about my students. So, when you are absent, you will email me and inform me of your absence and the reason for this absence. In addition, you will state the name of the student you will contact to ask about what you missed due to your absence. You will then email that student (and cc your instructor so I know who you are contacting) to inquire about missed work. I will NEVER contact you about missed work or conferences.

Participation is defined (but is not limited to) as follows:

  • Being prepared for class (supplies, texts, etc); showing up to class on time and being ready to work when your instructor begins class
  • Actively participating during class activities; asking and answering questions during discussions and volunteering your thoughts. You should plan on speaking up at least once during every class meeting.
  • Completing all assignments (including readings) by their due dates

Confidentiality and Privacy: You are responsible for what you choose to post to your website and you may choose to have your website omitted from search engines (MY SITE(S) -> WP ADMIN -> SETTINGS -> READING). Grades will never be posted to your website nor will any comments be made regarding your performance in this course. Additionally, work that you post to your own website may be password protected in order to preserve your privacy.

None of the work you submit to this Canvas course will be publicly viewable outside the English department at American University of Malta. Fellow students will not have access to your grades or my private comments to you.

Should you have any questions about pivacy and confidentiality, please contact me for more information.


EVALUATION: You may earn the following points…

NOTE: All work that is completed according to instructions will likely be considered satisfactory. You must ask yourself what you can do with your work, as a student and as a writer, to move it beyond satisfactory to truly noteworthy. You must go beyond “average” to receive such a grade at the end of the semester. You should consider satisfactory/unsatisfactory as pass/fail and noteworthy to be bonus for outstanding efforts. If a student completed solid, satisfactory work throughout the course, the highest grade that could be earned is 770 C. What will YOU do in this course to shine and achieve the higher grade?

The bulk of the course grade will be determined by (percentages are approximate):

  1. A graded portfolio, consisting of a revised paper at midterm plus an annotation, and selection of materials, including essay revisions and a reflective essay or extended annotation at the end of the quarter.  (midterm portfolio:  30%; final portfolio 30%)
  2. Class and peer review participation – includes completion of all in-class assignments, keeping up with reading.   (15%)
  3. Formal and informal out-of-class writing (includes reading responses) (25%)

 

Undergraduate Grading System
Grade GPA Points Percentage Scores Standard
A 4.0 93-100 Excellent
A- 3.7 90-93 Excellent
B+ 3.5 86-89 Very Good
B 3.0 83-85 Very Good
B- 2.7 80-82 Good
C+ 2.5 76-79 Good
C 2.0 73-75 Good
C- 1.7 70-72 Unsatisfactory
D+ 1.5 66-69 Unsatisfactory
D 1.0 63-65 Unsatisfactory
F 0 Below 63 Failure

 

UG Grading System.pdfPreview the documentView in a new window 

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