AUM Composition 1

Image from http://www.magoda.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/block-of-magazines.jpg

QUICK LINKS

Block of magazines [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://www.magoda.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/block-of-magazines.jpg


Instructor: Marlen Elliot Harrison, MA, PhD
About the Instructor: Marlen’s CV
Office and hours: TBA
Phone:
Email:


Instructor’s Description and Rationale: Where do you get your news? How do you keep up on your favorite hobbies and interests? Where can you find a wide array of ideas, opinions, images, videos and information? I can answer all three of these questions in one word: MAGAZINE. The word itself can be traced back to renaissance Europe (16th century) and denoted a “storehouse of information” (Dictionary.reference.com). This semester in Composition 1 we’ll learn how to make use of free, online website development software to create individual, themed online magazines, custom-designed warehouses of information. Being the editor of your own site means that you’ll be responsible for all of the content and style of the information you produce. You’ll also need to consider the needs of your audience and the significance of visual rhetoric. Through self-directed writing projects spanning a variety of genres; technology, presentation and language workshops; small group and instructor-student discussion; and writing, reading, and revising activities, students will also be introduced to qualitative inquiry, web 2.0 literacy and achieve a greater understanding of how to use language and technology to communicate in the global community.

Catalog Description: This module belongs to the “Communication in a global society” section of the General Education Component of every course that leads to a Bachelor Degree.  A mastery of effective written communication is an indispensable qualification of every university graduate. This module is an introduction to reading and writing in multiple genres and for multiple purposes.  This module prepares students to think critically about what they read and to write effectively in different rhetorical situations. The purpose of English Composition I is to introduce students to key concepts in the practical art or rhetoric that will serve them both in English Composition II and academic writing in a range of majors but also in the world beyond the university.  This module will provide students with opportunities to develop productive writing processes, to be able to identify and use claims and evidence effectively, and to work on understanding and employing conventions of particular genres.  Perhaps, most importantly, it will be one of the few opportunities at the university where students will work on and get extensive feedback on their own prose.


LEARNING OUTCOMES

Competences: At the end of the module/unit the learner will have acquired the responsibility and autonomy to:
a) Be responsible to evaluate the merits of multiple types of texts (in a range of genres) through the application of rhetorical principles.
b) Guide the production of multiple types of texts through rhetorical principles
c) Collaborate with other writers in the production of effective texts

Knowledge: At the end of the module/unit the learner will have been exposed to the following:
a) Multiple and varied reading and writing experiences both in academia and the real world
b) Strategies by which written texts can be analyzed for the purposes of learning and critique
c) Understanding how writers can exploit the writing process to produce effective texts
d) Strategies for critical reading
e) Knowledge about conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation

Skills: At the end of the module/unit the learner will have mastered the following skills:
The learner will be able to:
a) Identify specific features of texts, written or spoken, that cause them to be meaningful, purposeful, and effective for readers and listeners in a given situation
b) Write effectively in at least three different non-fiction prose genres
c) Read critically, identifying the rhetorical elements (ethos, pathos and logos) that make a text effective
d) Reflect on learner’s own writing and evaluate its rhetorical effectiveness
e) Demonstrate competency in using common formats for different kinds of texts
f) Exhibit flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing and proofreading
g) Apply a variety of genre conventions ranging from structure to paragraphing to tone and mechanics.

Judgment Skills and Critical Abilities: The learner will be able to:
a) Analyze and evaluate rhetorical moves in a range of texts (rhetorical analysis)
b) Integrate learner’s own ideas with those of others
c) Assess the effectiveness of one’s own writing as well as that of professional writers
d) Recognize and articulate the value of using multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text

Most importantly, the learner will be able to employ writing and reading for inquiry, thinking and communicating.



Required Materials:
A laptop computer, an active email account, a notebook, a pen, a highlighter, and a folder in which to keep handouts and other printed matter. You will also need an active internet connection, a web browser ( I recommend Firefox/Mozilla), a word processing program such as Microsoft Word or Apache Open Office, and a personal WordPress blog to serve as your magaine website/online portfolio.

It would be wise to have the following sites bookmarked in your browser (they are also listed in the main menu of this website under RESOURCES). These are my top ten online recommendations to assist you throughout this course:

We will also read the following text; please be green and frugal by purchasing it used or a digital version. I have provided a link to Amazon.com but please shop anywhere you wish. You will need the book within 7 days of the start of classes so purchase it asap.

Class Format: In this class, you will complete numerous individual reading and writing activities; you will also work together in small groups for feedback and discussion. At the beginning of each class (the first 5 minutes), we will review the homework posted to our blogs by our group members and offer comments and questions. We will then spend time reading literature reflective of the week’s theme and then discuss the reading first within our groups and then together as a class. We will meet regularly in small groups of three to review your writing and to discuss any questions you might have. The remainder of the class will be scheduled for writing activities.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted to your WORDPRESS sites. In this way, your site will also double as an online portfolio.

  • Homework: Weekly assignments will be posted to your websites. You will often be given time in class to start/complete these assignments. Consider the website a place where you can explore and develop your ideas and get feedback from classmates. The process of reading and commenting on our classmates’ sites is just as important as writing the texts. After all, most writing is meant to be consumed by an audience.
  • Writing Projects and “Articles”: There will be 4 original writing projects and one multimedia presentation that you will use to create your website. These  projects will be approximately 900-1200 words and the presentation 10-15 minutes. They must be appropriately formatted (APA/MLA/CMS) and the texts written in a variety of academic genres that you would typically find within your field. These writing assignments will be both posted to your websites and used for peer review assignments with classmates. All writing assignments are graded Excellent/Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory; students should expect to revise each writing a minimum of two or three times.
    • You will also select and introduce at least 15 additional theme-related “Articles” (texts/videos/images/RSS Feeds from other sites) to help you populate your magazine. These may be “blog entries” in the traditional sense, “advertisements” of your own creation, or any other genre you might typically find in an academic or career-related magazine/website. 2 paragraphs of text minimum per article.
    • NOTE ABOUT REVISIONS: When revising an essay, please follow these instructions:
      • Please post the revision on the same website page as your original essay and clearly designate which is the original and which is the revision.
      • Rather than creating a new set of goals, I would like you to thoroughly explain the changes you made from the previous draft. BE SPECIFIC. I will not accept revisions without a strong 2-3 paragraph explanation statement! Same goes for your peer-editing projects.
  • Peer Editing Projects: You will be responsible for responding to and evaluating three essays (2 written by your classmates, 1 written by you). You will explain your edits and responses via rubric and a 2-3 paragraph website entry and discuss them with the writers.
  • Portfolio and Cover Statement: You will keep all of your work, including ALL pre-writing such as mind maps, outlines, etc, and all drafts of your essays on your websites. By the end of the semester, you will have fulfilled the requirements for a final portfolio: a collection of work that showcases your learning and development. You will complete this course by writing an additional “cover statement”. Review the guidelines for the Final Portfolio (adapted from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Dept of English)
  • Reflective Letters: Your reflective letters will be written to your instructor and should be written with an appreciation for and an understanding of the letter genre. Your voice may be informal and you may use “you”. You will think about your progress throughout the semester and discuss your conclusions both at the mid-term and at the end of the semester. You may make suggestions for future courses, comment on specific assignments or components in the course, reflect on your progress, etc. 3-5 paragrpahs each, double-spaced. I will provide more information in the syllabus below.

Plagiarism Statement: “Unacknowledged borrowing of ideas, facts, phrases, wordings, or whole words in a paper, as well as the copying of another Students’ work all constitute plagiarism and are unacceptable in the university community. Students turning in plagiarized work may receive a failing grade for the essay or for the entire course. For more information, see the university policy on plagiarism in your student handbook, or ask me. We will also be discussing this topic more in class” (Schragel, 2006, Plagiarism statement).

(N)etiquette and Respect: All learners should consider and abide by the following (click the links to read more):

Attendance and Participation: You will receive points for every class you attend, based on your communication and participation. These points will be 10% part of your final grade and cannot be made up if lost.

Absences:

  • Let’s face it, everyone thinks that class is boring and quiet when you’re not there, so please try to plan on 100% attendance. More than two absences FOR ANY REASON (excluding week 1 which is REQUIRED) will result in a lowering of your final grade by 150 points.
  • Welcome to college…a place where it is your responsibility to complete all assignments by their due date, whether you are present in class or not. LATE WORK FOR ANY REASON WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Period. Done Deal. No questions asked. No excuses. No discussion.
  • I worry about my students. So, when you are absent, you will email/text me and inform me of your absence and the reason for this absence. In addition, you will state the name of the student you will contact to ask about what you missed due to your absence. You will then email that student (and cc your instructor so I know who you are contacting) to inquire about missed work. I will NEVER contact you about missed work or conferences.

Participation is defined (but is not limited to) as follows:

  • Being prepared for class (supplies, texts, etc); showing up to class on time and being ready to work when your instructor begins class
  • Actively participating during class activities; asking and answering questions during discussions and volunteering your thoughts. You should plan on speaking up at least once during every class meeting.
  • Completing all assignments (including readings) by their due dates

EVALUATION: You may earn the following points…

NOTE: All work that is completed according to instructions will likely be considered satisfactory. You must ask yourself what you can do with your work, as a student and as a writer, to move it beyond satisfactory to truly noteworthy. You must go beyond “average” to receive such a grade at the end of the semester. You should consider satisfactory/unsatisfactory as pass/fail and noteworthy to be bonus for outstanding efforts. If a student completed solid, satisfactory work throughout the course, the highest grade that could be earned is 770 C. What will YOU do in this course to shine and achieve the higher grade?

  • 10 Reflection, Reading & Planning Posts: 60/40/0 pts (6 pts each x 10; evaluated Noteworthy (6pts), Satisfactory (4pts) or Unsatisfactory (0pts); may NOT be revised for a higher score; all must be completed on time in order to receive full credit; one late/missed assignment allowed)
  • 20 Comments on Websites: 20/15/0 pts (1 pt each x 20; evaluated as a group Noteworthy(20)/Satisfactory(15)/Unsatisfactory(0))
  • 4 Main Projects (4): 400/300/0 pts (100 pts each x 4; evaluated Noteworthy(100)/Satisfactory(75)/Unsatisfactory(0); all may be revised for a higher score)
  • Presentation: 50/40/0 pts (15 pts for first draft evaluated Pass/Fail; 35 pts for final; evaluated Noteworthy (35pts), Satisfactory (25pts) or Unsatisfactory (0pts))
  • 15 Additional Theme-Related “Articles”: 45/0 pts (3 pts each x 15; evaluated Pass/Fail)
  • Peer Editing Projects: 60/45/0 pts (20 pts x 3; evaluated Noteworthy (20pts), Satisfactory (15pts) or Unsatisfactory (0pts))
  • Portfolio Cover Letter: 75/60/0 pts (evaluated Noteworthy(75)/Satisfactory(60)/Unsatisfactory(0); may NOT be revised for a higher score)
  • Meeting & Reading Reflections: 50/35/0 pts (10 pts x 5; evaluated Noteworthy (10)/Satisfactory(7)/Unsatisfactory(0); may NOT be revised for a higher score)
  • Final Exam: 100/50/0 pts (evaluated Pass/Fail; may NOT be revised for a higher score; completed/pass (100); completed/fail (50); incomplete (0))
  • Reflective Letters: 40/30/0 pts total; Mid-term, 15/10/0 pts; Final, 25/20/0 pts (evaluated Noteworthy/Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory; may NOT be revised for a higher score)
  • Participation: 100/60/0 pts (3 pts x 20 days; possible 40 pts extra for Noteworthy participation)
  • Bonus: 50 pts (5 perfect, additional articles; pass/fail evaluated as a whole)
  • Bonus Autoethnography: 100 pts (ask Marlen is you wish to do this)

A 920-1000 pts; AB 880-919 pts; B 820-879; BC 780-819; C 720-779; CD 680-719 pts; D 600-679 pts; F 599 pts and below


SCHEDULE (UT ACADEMIC CALENDAR)
Click each week to view those days’ schedules.


SYLLABUS (subject to change)

Remember the Spartan Code! As a member of The University of Tampa Spartan community, I agree and pledge that I will…

  • promote and practice academic and personal honesty.
  • commit to actions that benefit the community, as well as engage in activities that better others.
  • discourage intolerance and acknowledge that diversity in our community shapes our learning and development.
  • conduct myself in a manner that makes me worthy of the trust of others.
  • recognize the ideas and contributions of all persons, allowing for an environment of sharing and learning.
  • accept full responsibility and be held accountable for all of my decisions and actions.

T 8/27 – GETTING STARTED

Today in class we will:

  • Get to know each other better
  • Review course requirements
  • Create websites
  • Choose topics for course and brainstorm project topics via mindmap

Homework (due Thursday):

  • REFLECTION: As learners, we usually start with a great deal of enthusiasm and lose energy as a course progresses. Because of this, the beginning of this course is quite intense and the majority of the workload comes at the beginning. Jump in and do as much as you can now and you will find that the pace slows down considerably and that you have much more freedom in terms of your schedule towards the end.
  • Have your books arrived yet?

A. Set up and design your website

  • Visit http://Wordpress.com. You’ll find information about setting up your website in WordPress Support.
    1) Go to WordPress.com and click the orange “get started” icon.
    2) Add your email address.3) Add your website address and username…

    • last name followed by first name, e.g. Angelina Jolie = jolieangelina
    • no dots, dashes or spaces;
    • no special characters like ä or ö;
    • This site has no relation to the UT university website and email. Pick a password.
    • Write down (or store in your computer or smartphone) your username and password so that you don’t forget them.

4) Next, click CREATE blog (free) at the bottom of the page. Check your email and click the activation link.
5) Login to your website if not already logged in and click MY BLOGS in the top menu of WordPress.com. Find your website and click BLOG ADMIN to get to your website’s DASHBOARD. We’ll do more in class on the first day so please have at least these steps completed.
6) Add your website info at the bottom of this page as a comment. Please include: your name, course number and website address, e.g. Angelina Jolie, 101 H1, http://jolieangelina.wordpress.com. I will use this info to make a master list of website links for the class.

B. PAGES:

  • Pages are blank spaces where we can post information and will comprise the majority of your class-related work on writing & learning. The contents of these pages are not immediately visible on the front page of your website. Unlike posts (explained below), we cannot assign pages to categories. Create 7 new PAGES on your website by scrolling over PAGES in your DASHBOARD. You will use these later in this course: NOTES, PROJECTS, COMMENTS, PEER REVIEW, LETTERS, PORTFOLIO, & GOALS.
    • ABOUT: Edit the pre-existing ABOUT page (found in PAGES in your DASHBOARD), delete the existing text and include a short bio, magazine topic and a clear photo of your face (via ADD MEDIA above the text editor). Make sure to mention why you’ve chosen your magazine topic.
    • GOALS: Goal-setting is an important tool for learning. In your GOALS page, make a list of at least 3 goals you have for yourself while in this course and explain for each goal how you will go about achieving them. For example: “I want to improve my confidence in speaking to a group. To do this I will speak out in class more often than I usually do.” Part of your participation grade in this course will depend on your final reflective letter which will include an explanation of why and how you either met or did not meet these goals. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. page: GOALS
    • READING & NOTICING #1: Please post reflections on your NOTES page. You may respond to each reading separately or in unison. As you reflect on what you noticed in the readings, first summarize the most important information that relates to you, a student writer. Next, respond to the article(s) with your own opinions or highlighting what you feel is most important making sure to quote, paraphrase and summarize as necessary. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. page: NOTES

C. POSTS:

  • Posts will generally show up on the front page of your website in chronological order and will comprise the majority of your website’s themed content. We can assign posts to various categories of our own making. Go to POSTS and choose CATEGORIES in the dashboard. Create the following three categories: Projects; Articles; and Course Writing. The slugs can be the same words (projects, articles and course writing) and for parent choose none. You don’t need a description.
    • POST #1, INTRODUCE YOUR TOPIC: In your dashboard, scroll over POSTS and click ADD NEW. You’ll find the category option just below or next to your text editor; choose Course Writing. Because you have so many other things to do for this class, this blog post won’t be due until next Tuesday, 9/3. First, explain to your audience – a group of people whom you feel are interested in your topic – the relationship between you and your topic and why you are interested in developing a magazine about it. Please provide links to at least three different online magazines/websites related to your own that you will use as models for inspiration and writing genres. You may want to reflect on what you already know about the topic; what you might like to know more about; what most excites you about this topic; why and for whom you feel the topic is significant (who IS your audience?); etc. 3-5 paragraphs. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Course Writing

Th 8/29 – GENRES; SOURCES; MODELS

Today when you arrive in class, please immediately begin reading your BLOGROLL group members’ writing (ABOUT, NOTES). We’ll use the first 5-10 minutes of every class as time to read and comment. You’ll need to continue reading and commenting outside of class in order to fulfill the course requirement of at least 20 website comments for your group members throughout the semester. Today we will also review reading strategies, website use/development including security, review the basic requirements of the course again, and get started on our first writing project and articles.

  • Mimic & Rip: In-class activity & presentation, “Two websites/magazines that I love…”
  • Genre Theory: Getting to know forms and styles of writing

Homework for 6/4:

  • Have your books arrived yet?
  • POST #2: Do some research online and/or by talking with or emailing professors to identify the most common types of writing you will need to undertake a) for your college major and b) as a professional in your field. Knowing NOW what you’ll need to be able to do later will help us make decisions as you plan and develop your writing projects in this course. 1-2 paragraphs category: Course Writing
  • “ARTICLES” 1-3: Take a look at some of your favorite websites and online magazines to get familiar with layouts, genres, etc. Next, create and introduce three theme-related “Articles” in different POSTS titled, for example, “Article 1: Name of Article” (texts/videos/images/RSS Feeds from other sites) to help you populate your magazine. These may be “blog entries” in the traditional sense, “advertisements” of your own creation, or any other genres you might typically find in an academic or career-related magazine/website. 2 paragraphs of text minimum per article. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Articles
  • READING & NOTICING #2: Please post reflections on your NOTES page. You may respond to each reading separately or in unison. As you reflect on what you noticed in the readings, first summarize the most important information that relates to you, a student writer. Next, respond to the article(s) with your own opinions or highlighting what you feel is most important making sure to quote, paraphrase and summarize as necessary. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. page: NOTES

9/03 – Rhetoric; Genre; Revision

Today in class we will:

Homework for 9/5:

  • Do tonight’s homework first before returning to last Thursday’s work. Post number two and reading number two will be due by next Tuesday.
  • Have your books arrived yet?
  • COMMENTS 1-2: You should have left at least two comments on others’ blogs by now.
  • READING & NOTICING #3: Please post reflections on a new NOTES page. You may respond to each reading separately or in unison. As you reflect on what you noticed in the readings, first summarize the most important information that relates to you, a student writer. Next, respond to the article(s) with your own opinions or highlighting what you feel is most important making sure to quote, paraphrase and summarize as necessary. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. page: NOTES

9/5 – Revision practices; Writing & Emotion

Today in class we will:

Homework:

  • WRITING PROJECT #1: Develop a narrative story related to your magazine topic. 900-1200 words, posted to your blog on its own PAGE and then move that page under PROJECTS in your menu. Please make sure it is properly formatted with references/notes/works cited at end. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed.
    • Before you begin, in the page where you are putting the actual writing assignment, identify what your writing goals are: What do you want to accomplish (personal goals for the writing), what kind of writing is this (genre), & who are you writing to (intended audience)? Be thorough and specific and explain how you will achieve these goals. Think of it as a checklist for yourself! 1-2 paragraphs
    • At the end, on the same page as above, write 1-2 paragraphs clearly and THOROUGHLY responding to the same questions but in past tense this time, explaining how you accomplished (or didn’t accomplish) these goals/challenges.
    • *Remember Shitty First Drafts!!! (LOL)
    • **MOST IMPORTANTLY: You MUST have your work read out loud to you by another person while you follow along on your own copy with a highlighter/pen or while the file is open. Reading out loud to yourself won’t be enough. You’ll be shocked how many mistakes you find this way and wonder why no one ever made you do this before. Trust me!
  • We’ll start using books next week. Have yours arrived yet?

9/10 – Voice, Style, Power 1

Today in class we will:

Homework for 9/12:

  • READING: Elbow Section 6, Intro and Ch. 25; I do not give you credit for taking notes on the books or coming to class prepared to discuss the readings. That is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams.
  • Revise website work as necessary.

9/12 – Voice, Style, Power 2

Today in class we will:

Homework for 9/24:

  • Read and respond to comments left on your site
  • Leave comments on classmates’ sites
  • Complete all missing work
  • Consider the design of your website
  • READING & NOTICING #4, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY:  Please post reflections on a new NOTES page. In tonight’s homework, please respond to each reading separately in a single paragraph. As you reflect on what you noticed in the readings, first summarize the most important information in 3-5 sentences. Next, continue the paragraph with an additional 3-5 sentences responding to the article(s) with your own opinions or highlighting what you feel is most important making sure to quote, paraphrase and summarize as necessary. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. page: NOTES
    • First, review and briefly summarize both of the following in a single paragraph: Purdue Owl: Annotated Bibliographies and Purdue Owl: Examples of Anno Bibs
    • Next, identify FIVE different texts related to your magazine topic, ALL OF DIFFERENT GENRES. These should be new texts that you have not already included in your magazine. Please create an annotated bibliography of all 5 sources with one single paragraph for each source. Your writing should look like the examples provided by OWL PURDUE and follow the instructions I included above. You may use these sources as future “Articles” in your magazine.
    • Finally, in 1-2 paragraphs, respond to the following image using at least one additional source to aid your explanation. Click the image to view a larger version:Retrieved from: http://www.en.utexas.edu/Classes/Bremen/e316k/texts/author-reader.htmlRetrieved from: http://www.en.utexas.edu/Classes/Bremen/e316k/texts/author-reader.html
  • POST #3, EXISTING & MISSING: In your dashboard, scroll over POSTS and click ADD NEW. You’ll find the category option just below or next to your text editor; choose Course Writing. Explain to your audience – a group of people whom you feel are interested in your topic – what information already exists related to your topic and what information is currently missing; etc. 3-5 paragraphs. You’ll use the FIVE different sources of information, ALL DIFFERENT GENRES, that you summarized and responded to above. The main difference this time is that you must compare and contrast these sources to identify established and missing ideas/themes. As you examine and compose, reflect on the sources of information, credibility of those sources, styles and genres, and main content. This activity will help you to understand your community of practice and to develop writing projects that offer something new to the world about your topic. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Course Writing
  • REVISE your narrative for next week’s meetings:
    • NOTE ABOUT REVISIONS: When revising an essay, please follow these instructions:
      • Please post the revision on the same website page as your original writing and clearly designate which is the original and which is the revision.
      • Rather than creating a new set of goals, I would like you to thoroughly explain the changes you made from the previous draft. BE SPECIFIC. I will not accept revisions without a strong explanation statement! Same goes for your peer-editing projects.

9/17 & 19 – Consultations and catch-up!

No in-class meetings this week; small group consultations instead.

Homework for 9/24:

  • MEETING REFLECTION #1: Within 24 hours of your meeting, please post a reflection of today’s meeting being sure to follow my instructions below (category: COURSE WRITING):
    • Part 1: Begin by exhaustively reporting the feedback you received in bullet or paragraph form, BOTH praise and criticism please.
    • Part 2: Explain how, where, when you will use this feedback. Be explicit!
    • Part 3: Conclude with a reflection on the meeting overall. How did you feel emotionally/psychologically? How did it go? How could it have gone better? What did you learn by being present for your partner’s feedback? How do you feel about this method of feedback and assessment? Random thoughts?
  • REVISION WP #1: Consider today’s meeting and your reflections and prepare a revision of WP #1 for next week. When revising, please follow these instructions:
    • Please post the revision on the same website page as your original project and clearly designate which is the original and which is the revision.
    • Rather than creating a new set of goals, I would like you to thoroughly explain the changes you made from the previous draft. BE SPECIFIC. I will not accept revisions without a strong 2-3 paragraph explanation statement! Same goes for your peer-editing projects. Make sure you explain how you incorporated feedback from others (think of our consultation).
  • READING: Elbow, Ch’s 26, 27, 28 & 29; Lamott, Intro. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the books or coming to class prepared to discuss the readings. That is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!
  • “ARTICLES” 4-6: Take a look at some of your favorite websites and online magazines to get familiar with layouts, genres, etc. Next, create three theme-related “Articles” in different POSTS titled, for example, “Article 1: Name of Article” (texts/videos/images/RSS Feeds from other sites) to help you populate your magazine. These may be: “blog entries” in the traditional sense, “advertisements” of your own creation, or any other genres you might typically find in an academic or professional magazine/website. Please include the equivalent of at least 2 self-created paragraphs of text minimum per article. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Articles
  • Complete the homework from last week; catch up on all comments/responses; complete readings; re-consider your theme, header and background; re-consider your title; maybe get in touch with a course assistant; you could visit the writing center if interested; check out Marlen’s websites from http://marlenharrison.com and get to know him better; call your mom or dad; most importantly, please clean your room and do your laundry…

9/24 – REVIEW

Today in class we will review our on-line magazines, first writing projects, and reading and writing homework from the last two weeks. We’ll also discuss…

  • Paraphrasing/Quoting/Summarizing activity
  • Spider puke
  • ??? *students’ choice*

Homework for 9/24:

  • ENGLISH WORKSHOP PREP: Come to class Thursday with at least three different questions you have about English writing. For example, perhaps you need clarification on APA/MLA/CMS formatting. Maybe you need to know when to use semicolons vs colons.
  • READING: Lamott, Getting Started. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the books or coming to class prepared to discuss the readings. That is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!

9/26 – ENGLISH WORKSHOP 1 & Pre-writing

Today in class we will review questions you have about formatting/structure/mechanics/spelling/grammar/etc. We will also discuss…

  • Fear, self-hatred, and fantasy keys
  • Plans for Writing Project #2
  • The reading and noticing homework from Tuesday
  • Genre, audience and rhetoric
  • ??? *students’ choice*

Homework:

  • READING & NOTICING #5:  Please post reflections on your NOTES page. You may respond to each reading separately or in unison. As you reflect on what you noticed in the readings, first summarize the most important information that relates to you, a student writer. Next, respond to the article(s) with your own opinions or highlighting what you feel is most important making sure to quote, paraphrase and summarize as necessary. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. page: NOTES
  • WRITING PROJECT #2: Develop a non-narrative analysis of an issue related to your magazine topic in a genre of your choice. Please make sure to include at least two outside sources in your work. 900-1200 words, posted to your blog on its own PAGE and then move that page under PROJECTS in your menu. Please make sure it is properly formatted with references/notes/works cited at end. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed.
    • Before you begin, in the page where you are putting the actual writing assignment, identify what your writing goals are: What do you want to accomplish (personal goals for the writing), what kind of writing is this (genre), & who are you writing to (intended audience)? Be thorough and specific and explain how you will achieve these goals. Think of it as a checklist for yourself! 1-2 paragraphs
    • At the end, on the same page as above, write 1-2 paragraphs clearly and THOROUGHLY responding to the same questions but in past tense this time, explaining how you accomplished (or didn’t accomplish) these goals/challenges.
    • *Remember Shitty First Drafts!!! (LOL)
    • **MOST IMPORTANTLY: You MUST have your work read out loud to you by another person while you follow along on your own copy with a highlighter/pen or while the file is open. Reading out loud to yourself won’t be enough. You’ll be shocked how many mistakes you find this way and wonder why no one ever made you do this before. Trust me!

10/1 – REVIEW & English workshop 1

Today in class we will review our on-line magazines, first and second writing projects, and reading and writing homework from last week. We’ll also discuss…

  • http://ideaslaboratory.com
  • Paraphrasing/Quoting/Summarizing
  • Fear, self-hatred, and fantasy keys
  • BONUS POINT OFFER: We haven’t discussed prewriting activities beyond mind maps and free writing; what other kinds are there? Can you show me some examples on your blogs (in a post, category: course writing) in the coming weeks for possible bonus points?

Homework:

  • READING: Start reading Elbow, Section 5 on Feedback, Lamott, pp. 16-94. This is due by 10/15.
  • Check your blog and make sure all work is revised, up-to-date, formatted, cited, taken the extra mile, etc, for next week’s meeting.

10/3 – Peer Review 1

Practice giving written feedback: Work with a partner to create a rubric that can be used to evaluate  School Clubs. Your rubric should be simple and allow for both specific and holistic commentary about writing mechanics and research design. We are more interested in the effectiveness of the research, its ability to create a story for the reader, and its ability to address its audience than in its use of language. Post your completed rubric and all comments on your blog’s Peer Review page. SAMPLE RUBRIC

  • Schedule meetings; forward email and create new post for mtg.
  • ***Students’ Choice***

Homework:

  • PR #1: Complete peer review #1 for your meeting partner and be prepared to explain your responses in next week’s meeting. Post PR#1 to a new page and then move it under PR in your menu.


10/8 & 10/10 Consultations and Ketchup

No in-class meetings this week; small group consultations instead. Remember, this week is all about “ketchup”.

Homework for 10/15:

  • MEETING REFLECTION #2: Within 24 hours of your meeting, please post a reflection of today’s meeting being sure to follow my instructions below (category: COURSE WRITING):
    • Part 1: Begin by exhaustively reporting the feedback you received in bullet or paragraph form, BOTH praise and criticism please.
    • Part 2: Explain how, where, when you will use this feedback. Be explicit!
    • Part 3: Conclude with a reflection on the meeting overall. How did you feel emotionally/psychologically? How did it go? How could it have gone better? What did you learn by being present for your partner’s feedback? How do you feel about this method of feedback and assessment? Random thoughts?
  • REVISION WP #2: Consider today’s meeting and your reflections and prepare a revision of WP #2 for next week. When revising, please follow these instructions:
    • Please post the revision on the same website page as your original project and clearly designate which is the original and which is the revision.
    • Rather than creating a new set of goals, I would like you to thoroughly explain the changes you made from the previous draft. BE SPECIFIC. I will not accept revisions without a strong 2-3 paragraph explanation statement! Same goes for your peer-editing projects. Make sure you explain how you incorporated feedback from others (think of our consultation).
  • READING: Elbow, Ch. 5 on Feedback; Lamott, pp. 16-94. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the books or coming to class prepared to discuss the readings. That is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!
  • “ARTICLES” 7-9: Take a look at some of your favorite websites and online magazines to get familiar with layouts, genres, etc. Next, create three theme-related “Articles” in different POSTS titled, for example, “Article 1: Name of Article” (texts/videos/images/RSS Feeds from other sites) to help you populate your magazine. These may be: “blog entries” in the traditional sense, “advertisements” of your own creation, or any other genres you might typically find in an academic or professional magazine/website. Please include the equivalent of at least 2 self-created paragraphs of text minimum per article. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Articles
  • Complete the homework from last week; catch up on all comments/responses; complete readings; re-consider your theme, header and background; re-consider your title; maybe get in touch with a course assistant; you could visit the writing center if interested; check out Marlen’s websites from http://marlenharrison.com and get to know him better; call your brother or sister; most importantly, please remember that I don’t really like milk chocolate…


10/15 Visual Rhetoric

Today in class we will:

Homework:

  • REFLECTIVE LETTER #1: Write a reflective letter to your instructor discussing your experience in the course, post it to its own page titled LETTER #1, and then place it under Letters in your custom menu. This should not be an essay, but rather an actual “letter” that addresses any or all of the following:
    * What grade do you currently have? Do you think you deserve it? Why? Look at the course guidelines at top to help you explain.
    * What were your expectations of a) your own performance and b) the course overall and a) how did you meet or not meet your own expectations and b) how did the course meet or not meet your expectations?
    * What was the most useful activity or assignment in terms of advancing your knowledge of Academic Writing? Why?
    * What would you have done differently if taking the course a second time? What recommendations can you make to your instructor to improve this course for future students? What could your instructor have done differently in order to receive an “A” from you for his teaching and course design?
    * What was your greatest challenge in this course and how did you successfully or unsuccessfully meet this challenge?
    * How will this course be useful to you in the future?
    * Discuss the progress you’ve made, or not made, towards your goals.
    * If you have taken more than one course with me, how did the courses go together? What has your overall experience been while working with me and how have you developed as a student, person, writer, etc?
    Note: You are not limited to the above questions; feel free to write about anything you want your instructor to know. It may be helpful to look at course assistants’ past letters to give you an ideas of what I want.
  • READING & NOTICING #6:  Please post reflections on your NOTES page. You may respond to each reading separately or in unison. As you reflect on what you noticed in the readings, first summarize the most important information that relates to you, a student writer. Next, respond to the article(s) with your own opinions or highlighting what you feel is most important making sure to quote, paraphrase and summarize as necessary. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. page: NOTES

10/17 Visual Rhetoric, cont’d.

Today in class we will:

  • Continue discussion of visual rhetoric

Homework:

  • PEER REVIEW #1, PART 2: Look at your partner’s revision and create a 2nd rubric reflecting changes in the 2nd draft. Post it to PR#1 page and clearly label it REVISION RUBRIC.
  • “ARTICLES” 10-12: Take a look at some of your favorite websites and online magazines to get familiar with layouts, genres, etc. Next, create three theme-related “Articles” in different POSTS titled, for example, “Article 1: Name of Article” (texts/videos/images/RSS Feeds from other sites) to help you populate your magazine. These may be: “blog entries” in the traditional sense, “advertisements” of your own creation, or any other genres you might typically find in an academic or professional magazine/website. Please include the equivalent of at least 2 self-created paragraphs of text minimum per article. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Articles
  • READING: The Digital Imperative; Part Two in Lamott, The Writing Frame of Mind. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!


10/22 Visual Rhetoric, cont’d.

Today in class we will:

Homework:

  • PEER REVIEW #1, PART 2: Look at your partner’s revision and create a 2nd rubric reflecting changes in the 2nd draft. Post it to PR#1 page and clearly label it REVISION RUBRIC.
  • “ARTICLES” 10-12: Take a look at some of your favorite websites and online magazines to get familiar with layouts, genres, etc. Next, create three theme-related “Articles” in different POSTS titled, for example, “Article 1: Name of Article” (texts/videos/images/RSS Feeds from other sites) to help you populate your magazine. These may be: “blog entries” in the traditional sense, “advertisements” of your own creation, or any other genres you might typically find in an academic or professional magazine/website. Please include the equivalent of at least 2 self-created paragraphs of text minimum per article. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Articles
  • WRITING PROJECT #3 DUE BY YOUR MEETING: Develop a writing project related to your magazine topic in any genre of your choice. Please make sure to include at least two outside sources in your work. 900-1200 words, posted to your blog on its own PAGE and then move that page under PROJECTS in your menu. Please make sure it is properly formatted with references/notes/works cited at end. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed.
    • Before you begin, in the page where you are putting the actual writing assignment, identify what your writing goals are: What do you want to accomplish (personal goals for the writing), what kind of writing is this (genre), & who are you writing to (intended audience)? Be thorough and specific and explain how you will achieve these goals. Think of it as a checklist for yourself! 1-2 paragraphs
    • At the end, on the same page as above, write 1-2 paragraphs clearly and THOROUGHLY responding to the same questions but in past tense this time, explaining how you accomplished (or didn’t accomplish) these goals/challenges.
    • *Remember Shitty First Drafts!!! (LOL)
    • **MOST IMPORTANTLY: You MUST have your work read out loud to you by another person while you follow along on your own copy with a highlighter/pen or while the file is open. Reading out loud to yourself won’t be enough. You’ll be shocked how many mistakes you find this way and wonder why no one ever made you do this before. Trust me!
    • TO BE COMPLETED BY YOUR MEETING
  • PEER REVIEW #2, Part 1 TO BE COMPLETED BY YOUR MEETING: Complete the first peer review #2 for your meeting partner and be prepared to explain your responses in next week’s meeting. Post PR#2 to a new page and then move it under PR #1 in your menu. Please follow Straub’s advice in Responding to Other Student’s Writing and write comments on a printed draft or insert comments via your word processing software (Pages, Word, etc). Please summarize your comments in 2-3 paragraphs and post it to your blog’s PR #2 page along with the commented file/screenshots/photos of your responses.
  • READING (if you haven’t already): The Digital Imperative; Part Two in Lamott, The Writing Frame of Mind. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!

10/24 – WRITING REVIEW **BONUS OPTION**

Today in class we will review what we have created so far in order to:

  • examine our strengths, challenge areas, improvements as writers and communicators;
  • adjust our current learning goals, reflect on previous ones;
  • clarify our knowledge of website development, visual rhetoric and “audience” as concept;
  • review our understanding of inquiry at the college level including the purposes and practices of formatting styles, quality of information;
  • identify questions we have about writing;
  • share our most commonly used tools and effective practices as writer-inquirers with classmates.

We will also:

  • Schedule appts for next week’s meetings

Homework for 11/5:

  • READING: Part Three in Lamott, Help Along the Way; Elbow: Section 1, Ch. 1 “An Approach to Writing” and your choice of two other chapters from this section; Elbow: Section 2, Intro and your choice of two other chapters from this section. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!


10/29 & 10/31 Consultations and Ketchup

No in-class meetings this week; small group consultations instead. Remember, this week is all about “ketchup”.

Homework for 11/5:

  • MEETING REFLECTION #3: Within 24 hours of your meeting, please post a reflection of today’s meeting being sure to follow my instructions below (category: COURSE WRITING):
    • Part 1: Begin by exhaustively reporting the feedback you received in bullet or paragraph form, BOTH praise and criticism please.
    • Part 2: Explain how, where, when you will use this feedback. Be explicit!
    • Part 3: Conclude with a reflection on the meeting overall. How did you feel emotionally/psychologically? How did it go? How could it have gone better? What did you learn by being present for your partner’s feedback? How do you feel about this method of feedback and assessment? Random thoughts?
  • REVISION WP #3: Consider today’s meeting and your reflections and prepare a revision of WP #3 for next week. When revising, please follow these instructions:
    • Please post the revision on the same website page as your original project and clearly designate which is the original and which is the revision.
    • Rather than creating a new set of goals, I would like you to thoroughly explain the changes you made from the previous draft. BE SPECIFIC. I will not accept revisions without a strong 2-3 paragraph explanation statement! Same goes for your peer-editing projects. Make sure you explain how you incorporated feedback from others (think of our consultation).
  • READING: Part Three in Lamott, Help Along the Way; Elbow: Section 1, Ch. 1 “An Approach to Writing” and your choice of two other chapters from this section; Elbow: Section 2, Intro and your choice of two other chapters from this section. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!
  • “ARTICLES” 13-15: Take a look at some of your favorite websites and online magazines to get familiar with layouts, genres, etc. Next, create three theme-related “Articles” in different POSTS titled, for example, “Article 1: Name of Article” (texts/videos/images/RSS Feeds from other sites) to help you populate your magazine. These may be: “blog entries” in the traditional sense, “advertisements” of your own creation, or any other genres you might typically find in an academic or professional magazine/website. Please include the equivalent of at least 2 self-created paragraphs of text minimum per article. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed. category: Articles
  • Complete the homework from last week; catch up on all comments/responses; complete readings; re-consider your theme, header and background; re-consider your title; maybe get in touch with a course assistant; you could visit the writing center if interested; check out Marlen’s websites from http://marlenharrison.com and get to know him better; start thinking about summer internships and jobs that will advance your career rather than just give you a paycheck…have you considered an alternative break?

11/5 – FYW 101 REVIEW

Today in class we will:

  • Review course goals and objectives
  • Review readings
  • Review articles
  • Review citations & formatting

Homework:

  • PEER REVIEW #2, PART 2: Look at your partner’s revision for the 3rd writing project and create another rubric reflecting changes in the new draft. Post it to PR#2 page and clearly label it REVISION RUBRIC.
  • READING REFLECTIONS DUE BY 12/1: Choose an online retailer such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, etc and write a review of both Bird by Bird and Writing with Power. You should have a keen sense of your audience as you do this. Your goal is to develop an interesting, thoughtful, mature, insightful appraisal of your texts. Take a screenshot of your review or copy/paste it to a post titled READING REFLECTIONS. This is due by December 1st. (Post, category: course writing)
  • READING: Using the internet to find info; Evaluating sources. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!

11/7 – CLASS MEETING, INTRO TO RESEARCH

Today in class we will:

  • Be introduced to an array of college-level research genres
  • Discuss critical information management and related software/apps
  • Review autoethnography

Homework:

  • READING: Part Four in Lamott – Publication. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!


11/12 & 11/14

Homework:

  • Complete final revisions of your first three writing projects and a first draft of project #3.
  • Make sure your peer review projects #1 and #2 are completed.
  • Finish up leaving blog comments for the other classes’ students. You need a total of twenty.
  • Start working on your PORTFOLIO COVER LETTER:  You will keep all of your work, including ALL pre-writing such as mind maps, outlines, etc, and all drafts of your projects on your blogs. By the end of the semester, you will have fulfilled the requirements for a final portfolio; you will complete this process by writing an additional “cover statement”. Review the guidelines for the Final Portfolio (adapted from Indiana University of Pennsylvania Dept of English).
  • Start work on your autoethnography or bonus posts/articles should you wish to do so.
  • Check in with a course assistant for reading out loud, general advice, brainstorming suggestions, etc.
  • Start brainstorming what you’d like to do for your 10-15 minute presentation in December. The topic must reflect our course themes of language, culture and sensory/phenomenological experience and must use a presentation aid.
  • WRITING PROJECT #4 DUE BY YOUR MEETING: Develop a writing project related to your magazine topic in any genre of your choice that illustrates your developing understanding of academic writing and inquiry. Just because I am asking for an academic project doesn’t necessarily mean it needs to be an essay. This is your last project in the course and your final chance to really wow me by showing me how much you’ve developed a) your magazine topic and b) as a writer since the beginning of this course. Please make sure to include at least two outside sources in your work that come from PEER REVIEWED JOURNALS. 900-1200 words, posted to your blog on its own PAGE and then move that page under PROJECTS in your menu. Please make sure it is properly formatted with references/notes/works cited at end. Feel free to include images, quotes, outside sources, video, links, etc. Please format all information that is neither your own idea nor common knowledge according to APA/MLA/AMA/CMS/etc rules with in-text citations and a final Works Cited/References as needed.
    • Before you begin, in the page where you are putting the actual writing assignment, identify what your writing goals are: What do you want to accomplish (personal goals for the writing), what kind of writing is this (genre), & who are you writing to (intended audience)? Be thorough and specific and explain how you will achieve these goals. Think of it as a checklist for yourself! 1-2 paragraphs
    • At the end, on the same page as above, write 1-2 paragraphs clearly and THOROUGHLY responding to the same questions but in past tense this time, explaining how you accomplished (or didn’t accomplish) these goals/challenges.
    • *Remember Shitty First Drafts!!! (LOL)
    • **MOST IMPORTANTLY: You MUST have your work read out loud to you by another person while you follow along on your own copy with a highlighter/pen or while the file is open. Reading out loud to yourself won’t be enough. You’ll be shocked how many mistakes you find this way and wonder why no one ever made you do this before. Trust me!
    • TO BE COMPLETED BY YOUR MEETING
  • PEER REVIEW #3 – SELF-ANALYSIS, Part 1 TO BE COMPLETED BY YOUR MEETING: Complete the first peer review #3 for YOUR OWN 4th writing project and be prepared to explain your responses in next week’s meeting. Post PR#3 to a new page and then move it under PR #1 in your menu. Please do both a rubric and margin comments; show me both your rubric and comments to receive credit.
  • READING: Part Four in Lamott – Publication; Elbow, Part Three, Revision – Skim these chapters. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!
  • READING REFLECTIONS DUE BY 12/1: Choose an online retailer such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, etc and write a review of both Bird by Bird and Writing with Power. You should have a keen sense of your audience as you do this. Your goal is to develop an interesting, thoughtful, mature, insightful appraisal of your texts. Take a screenshot of your review or copy/paste it to a post titled READING REFLECTIONS. This is due by December 1st. (Post, category: course writing)
  • READING: Using the internet to find info; Evaluating sources. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!
  • BONUS OPTION MOVIE POST: Create a response to one of the following films both summarizing what you saw and then offering your own personal opinion and comparisons with your current and past writing experiences.
    DEAD POET’S SOCIETY
    FINDING FORRESTER
    FREEDOM WRITERS
    Be sure to quote, paraphrase and summarize along the way using perfect formatting. Responses that show a combination of strong writing, sound inquiry and visual creativity will earn bonus points. Watch and write about all three movies and I’ll double your bonus points.


11/19 & 11/21 Consultations and Ketchup

No in-class meetings this week; small group consultations instead. Remember, this week is all about “ketchup”.

Homework:

  • MEETING REFLECTION #4: Within 24 hours of your meeting, please post a reflection of today’s meeting being sure to follow my instructions below (category: COURSE WRITING):
    • Part 1: Begin by exhaustively reporting the feedback you received in bullet or paragraph form, BOTH praise and criticism please.
    • Part 2: Explain how, where, when you will use this feedback. Be explicit!
    • Part 3: Conclude with a reflection on the meeting overall. How did you feel emotionally/psychologically? How did it go? How could it have gone better? What did you learn by being present for your partner’s feedback? How do you feel about this method of feedback and assessment? Random thoughts?
  • REVISION WP #4: Consider today’s meeting and your reflections and prepare a revision of WP #4. When revising, please follow these instructions:
    • Please post the revision on the same website page as your original project and clearly designate which is the original and which is the revision.
    • Rather than creating a new set of goals, I would like you to thoroughly explain the changes you made from the previous draft. BE SPECIFIC. I will not accept revisions without a strong 2-3 paragraph explanation statement! Same goes for your peer-editing projects. Make sure you explain how you incorporated feedback from others (think of our consultation).
  • PEER REVIEW #3, PART 2: Look at your revision for the 4th writing project, create a 2nd rubric reflecting changes in the 2nd draft and insert margin comments. Post it to PR#3 page and clearly label it REVISION RUBRIC.
  • READING: Elbow: Section 4, Audience. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!
  • Complete the homework from last week; catch up on all comments/responses; complete readings; re-consider your theme, header and background; re-consider your title; maybe get in touch with a course assistant; you could visit the writing center if interested; check out Marlen’s websites from http://marlenharrison.com and get to know him better; start thinking about summer internships and jobs that will advance your career rather than just give you a paycheck…have you considered an alternative break?

11/26 & 11/28 THXGVG, NO CLASSES

  • PLEASE COMPLETE ONLINE SURVEY; IF THERE IS A 100% RESPONSE RATE, THE ENTIRE CLASS WILL RECEIVE 25 BONUS POINTS.


12/3 – Class Mtg; Intro to Presentations

READING: Lamott, Section Five, The Last Class. I do not give you credit for taking notes on the readings at this point in the semester as you should now be doing it anyhow with or without class credit as an effective practice; it is part of your responsibility as a college student. I will reward those who are fully prepared with bonus and deduct participation points for unprepared students. While I do not give you tests, you should treat our class discussions as oral exams and opportunities to shine. If you are shy, prepare ahead of time with something to reflect on and raise your hand at the beginning of class. Keep doing this and with time you’ll find yourself much more comfortable speaking out in class!

12/5 – PRESENTATIONS 1; Classroom meeting, review of final documents



GENERAL RESOURCES



WEEKLY OVERVIEW


SYLLABUS

Week 1 – Introductions and literacy narrative

Because students may or may not know one another and because in this kind of module, they will be working closely together, it is useful to spend the first day with ice-breaking activities, particularly those related to the subject of the module, that is, reading, writing, and thinking.  For example:  students could write a self-introduction to the class about their writing experiences or attitudes toward writing.  It is also recommended that students write a “diagnostic essay,” not only for the instructor to gauge writing fluencies but to acquire information about students that may be valuable in helping them during the term.

Sample Diagnostic:

PURPOSE:  To help ensure a good experience in this class, it would be helpful for me to know something about how you write and how you learn, particularly in school.  Thus, this assignment has a dual objective:  it will give me a sense of you as a writer and, while this First-Year Writing class will be different from modules you have taken in high school, it could serve to help me understand what, for you, constitutes a positive learning environment.

ASSIGNMENT: Think about the best class you have taken during the last two years (or when you were last in school). What specifically made this class such a positive experience for you? Describe the class in as much detail as needed to give me a clear sense of it. For example, you might want to discuss content or subject matter, class activities, class atmosphere, evaluation procedures, what the teacher was like—anything you think was important in making this module a positive experience for you. Then, on the basis of this experience, describe what kind of class would be your ideal learning experience and why.

AUDIENCE:  Your instructor.

LENGTH:  2 pages, double-spaced.

These should be collected and read, but not corrected or graded.  Emphasize to students that these short essays serve to get students writing (in a low stakes situation) and provide useful information for the instructor.

Reading and reading journals.  Each formal written assignment can be accompanied by reading assignments to which students should respond.  In their responses, students  should briefly summarize the reading (and they may ongoing need help with this);  then they should write a paragraph or two on what they think, feel, believe and know about the ideas in the reading.  Later in the semester, when students are more confident and experienced, students should, in addition, comment on the style of the reading, or how the writers get their ideas across.  This week, the instructor should provide a sample response for a particular reading so students know is expected.  Reading responses do not need extensive comments from the instructor, although the first set may benefit from comments to ensure that students are on the right track.  Since these should be low stakes responses, grading is not necessary, although students should be given completion credit.

Provide students with their first assignment (and readings):

LITERACY EVENT ASSIGNMENT

OBJECTIVES:  First, this assignment is designed to give you an opportunity to work on narrative writing.  Second, it should serve as a catalyst to a reflective investigation into your background as a reader and writer.  Third, it will help me and others interested in teaching learn about the kinds of events you experienced that you believe had an impact on the kind of literate person you are today.

READING AND CONTEXT:  Malcolm X’s “Homemade Education”; Helen Keller’s “A Word for Everything,” Maxine Hong Kingston’s “The Language of Silence” [Note to instructor:  feel free to supply other short essays of your choice that provide ideas and samples of writers reflecting on their own language acquisition.]  For this assignment, consider a literacy event as any event that loosely involves reading or writing—not necessarily in school.  This may be the learning of new and meaningful vocabulary, the writing of a story or essay, a particular reading experience, reading or writing interactions with parents, friends, teachers, or other students.

ASSIGNMENT:  Write a 3-4 page essay in which you describe a literacy event or experience— positive or negative—from your past.  The event can come from your experience in school or in the world outside; it may be something you experienced in your early life, or it can be something you’ve encountered recently.  Use the readings as models, particularly for vividness of description and manner of reflection.

FORM:  The essay should have two parts: narrative and reflection.

Narrative:  A narrative is a story.  Because this is an assignment that must explain the event to others–me, your classmates (immediate audience), and teachers and other adults (ultimate audience), you will need to narrate the experience as fully and as richly as possible.  Your essay should be filled with concrete and specific details.  Furthermore, “literacy events” do not take place in a void; they are always part of some larger experience.  Pay attention to the larger experience.  Include, as appropriate, descriptions of the particulars of the experience:  setting, characters (people involved), dialogue, background, and drama.

Reflection:  Your essay should also reflect on why this event was (or is) of such importance and offer an explanation or evaluation.   For example, you might consider what kind of impact this experience had on your attitudes toward reading or writing.  How did it affect you as a person?  How would you rate its long-term effects?  What impact might this have on others in similar situations?  In other words, the reflection should try to answer the question:  so what?

The reflection portion is your claim; the narrative is your evidence.

TARGET AUDIENCE:  Teachers, administrators, even politicians with an education agenda who want to learn how literacy experiences have affected students, positively or negatively.  So this will be an adult audience, but you’re the one with the most recent experience.  You’re the expert.

DUE DATES: Rough drafts are due on first class period (week 2).  Final draft due last class period (week 2).  Final drafts must be typed, double-spaced.  I would like to read both the rough draft and the final version.

Invention activity:  It’s useful this week to provide some strategies to help students generate ideas for their essays.  Chapter 3 in the St. Martin’s Handbook is a good chapter to have students read, as it provides helpful ideas on coming up with ideas (e.g., brainstorming, freewriting, journaling), planning and drafting).  Students can work on these in class.

Week 2 – Literacy Narrative

 

This week, students should bring their rough drafts to class for peer review.  Students will need guidance in order to understand its purpose and instructor’s expectations are (See section above on Peer Review).  Upon completion of the peer review activity, students should to write up a short explanation of what they did in the peer review, including what feel about their draft afterwards, with specifics on what they plan to do to revise.

Based on peer feedback, students should revise their drafts, which they will then submit to the instructor for comments.   As they submit their final drafts, they can fill out a Process Report that they share with the instructor, inviting them to reflect on their drafting.

Process Report

  1. How much time (about) did you spend planning this paper? (Include reading, note-taking, invention, brainstorming, outlining, etc.)  Explain what you did.
  2. How much time did you spend drafting? Revising?
  3. What do you believe are the strengths of this paper? On what levels does it work well?
  4. What do you think are the weaknesses in the paper? What might you do differently or change in this paper if you had more time?
  5. What do you want a reader to think or understand after having read this paper? (This should be something he or she didn’t already know.)
  6. What kind of feedback would you like me to give on your paper? If you ultimately decide to revise this for your portfolio, how can I help?

Week 3 – Composing Process

 

The primary activity for this week is the writing of students’ composing processes.   The purpose is to help students see how complex and recursive the writing process can be, and also provide them with perspectives on how other people write.  If there is time, instructors might write a draft of their own composing process paper to share with students.  Often this has the effect of demystifying writing; students see that writing is difficult and complicated for even experienced writers.

 

THE COMPOSING PROCESS

 

PURPOSE:  Becoming aware of the process that we use to come up with a topic for any form of writing and the processes and approaches we have for bringing that written text to completion can help us better understand writing in general and our own writing in particular.  The goal of this assignment is to work on coming to terms with “the writing process.”  Many writers have similar problems (such as writer’s block, not allowing sufficient time for revision, lack of development, etc.), while other difficulties may be very individual.  What you learn about your own process may help to understand yourself better as a writer.  This assignment also presents an opportunity to describe and process and analyze it, theorizing about why the process works (or where it falls apart).

ASSIGNMENT:  This assignment has two levels.  On the one hand, explore your writing process.  Then try to develop a theory about why your process is as it is.

BE SPECIFIC.  Use specific examples of papers and writing experiences to illustrate your points.

Here are some questions that might help stimulate your thinking.  Don’t feel you have to answer all of them.

  1. Do you have a favorite place to write or essential elements that you need as you compose, such as a certain room, a favorite pen?  Do you have particular aversions or addictions to noise, music, television shows, or food?  Why?
  2. Do you compose with pen and paper, typewriter, or computer? If you use a word processor, has this changed your writing from the days of pen or pencil and paper?  How does the technology of writing affect what you say and how you say it?
  3. Do you have trouble getting started? Do you cross things out and rewrite or write the first draft all the way through?  At what points do you revise?  How would you characterize the types of revisions?
  4. What techniques do you use to avoid writing? What seems to be going on psychologically?
  5. How do you organize your thoughts? Do you use a prewriting strategy like clustering or outlining?
  6. Have you experienced writer’s block? If so, what method do you use to get past it?  Why does this work?
  7. How do you feel about writing, about yourself as a writer? Does this help or get in the way when you write?
  8. Have you developed a system of writing that works most of the time? Is there any one part of the writing process that is more difficult?
  9. How do you feel about throwing a piece of writing out and starting completely over? How do you feel about your end product?  Are you protective or possessive of your work?  Is your writing part of your personal identity?

Feel free to discuss any aspects of the writing process that occur to you; again, don’t feel limited to the above questions.  I am not looking for the quick or obvious answer here.  The best responses attempt to analyze what goes on intellectually, psychologically, and emotionally as you grapple with these issues.

Because only one week is planned for this assignment, instructors may want students to write a rough draft in class, engage in some discussion about these drafts and/or peer review, then have students revise these and submit for instructor response at the end of the week.

Invention Activity:   Working through the questions on the assignment sheet if often a good way to help students generate ideas.  You may also want to work on an in-class lesson, either on a feature or challenge that you’ve noticed students having trouble with or on Claims and Evidence (below).

Activity:  CLAIMS AND EVIDENCE

(from Writing Analytically, David Rosenwasser and Jill Stephen (Harcourt College Publishers, 2000)

 

A CLAIM is what you want to prove.  It is a point that you make about the meaning of your subject.  The primary claim in a paper is the thesis.

EVIDENCE refers to the information that is used to corroborate (support) a claim, though we use the term more broadly to refer to the pool of primary material (data) being analyzed.

In all disciplines, it is important to support claims with evidence, to make your evidence lead to claims, and especially to be explicit about how you’ve arrived at the connection between your evidence and your claims.

Evidence, rarely if ever, can be left to speak for itself.   Also, the farther away your language gets from concrete references to physical detail—things that you can see, hear, count, taste, smell, and touch—the more abstract it becomes.  A pizza covered with anchovies and red sauce is concrete; the phrase “delicious food” is abstract.

DISTINGUISHING EVIDENCE FROM CLAIMS

Label the following sentences with an “E” (evidence) or a “C” (claim).

A.

The owners are ruining baseball in America.  Although they claim that they are losing money, they are really just been greedy.  A few years ago, they even fired the commissioner, Fay Vincent, because he took the players’ side.  Baseball is a sport, not a business, and it is a sad fact that it is being threatened by greedy businessmen.

B.

Baseball is a sport, not a business, and it is a sad fact that it is being threatened by greedy businessmen.  For example, Eli Jacobs, the previous owner of the Baltimore Orioles, recently sold the team to Peter Angelos for $100 million more than he had spent ten years earlier when he purchased it.  Also a new generation of baseball parks has been built for the Orioles in Baltimore, for the White Sox in Chicago, for the Rangers in Arlington, for the Indians in Cleveland.  These parks are enormously expensive and include elaborate scoreboards and luxury boxes.  The average baseball players, meanwhile now earn over a million dollars a year, and they all have agents to represent them.  Barry Bonds, the left fielder for the San Francisco Giants, is paid over $7 million a season.  Sure, he has won the coveted Most Valuable Player award (MVP) in his league three times, but is any ballplayer worth that much money?

Evidence:  You have to show how and why the evidence supports the conclusions.  Evidence can almost always be interpreted in more than one way.

TWO STEPS TO EXPLAIN YOUR EVIDENCE:

  1. State explicitly what you take the details to mean
  2. State exactly how the evidence supports or qualifies your claim.

ANALYZING EVIDENCE IN DEPTH

 

The more you examine something, the more you will discover to say about it.

Problem:  insufficiently analyzed evidence about which the writer repeatedly makes the same general claim.

Solution:  It is generally better to make ten points on a single representative issue or example (10 on 1) than to make the same basic point about ten related issues or examples.  Use 10 on 1 to:

  • Locate the range of possible meanings your evidence suggests
  • Slow down the hasty move to generalization and thus help to ensure that when you leap to a claim, that claim will be more specific, and better able to account for your evidence.
  • Make you less inclined to cling to your first claim inflexibly, opening the way for you to discover a way of representing more fully the complexity of your subject.

Student can then work to apply this to their own drafts.

Week 4 – Writing in a particular genre:  the Review

Why a review?  A review is a genre that is used both inside academia and outside.  It is also a genre that has specific components that vary according to the target audience, where it appears, and the general context.  The goal here is to work with students through an understanding of how genre is impacted by readers, purposes, and contexts, and how these, in turn motivated style choices.

Review Assignment

 

Purpose:  We are now turning to a different genre:  the review.  We’ll be analyzing the genre as a genre, and then you’ll write a review in the same genre.

Assignment:  Write a two-three page review of a new film or music release or a restaurant (local) modeled after sample reviews in [a local newspaper, magazine, or online location—something students will be able to easily access].

  1. Read at least 3 sample reviews (RECENT reviews in the category you select) from the [specific newspaper, magazine or online location]
  2. Download the “Guidelines for Analyzing Genres” (see below).
  3. Look at the reviews in terms of the four sets of prompts in the Guidelines. Then write up the answers to the prompts.  While this is not a formal paper, it should be typed and saved; it will serve as a set of notes for your e-portfolio and as a style guide to your draft (indicating audience, tone, format, images, structure, word choice, sentencing, etc.).  Here’s the format for the analysis:
    1. List the reviews you looked at
    2. Identify the scene and describe the situation of the genre you looked at
    3. Identify the patterns of the genre’s features
    4. Analyze what these patterns indicate about the situation and scene.
  4. Do the research: see the film or listen to the album or visit the restaurant.  The film or music can be a recent theatrical release or a recent DVD release, or there must be a compelling reason to re-review something that’s already been reviewed to death.  Don’t rely on your memory of something that you’ve seen/listened to/visited years, months, or even weeks ago.   Re-visit it.

 

Due Dates:

  • Write up the genre analysis by XXXX date. Bring to class.
  • Rough draft due on XXXX date. You must have a rough draft for class; bring three copies.
  • Final draft due on XXXX date.

The goal this week is to help student analyze this particular genre.   The instructor should pick the type or types of reviews that would be appropriate and where they would appear.  Then students should bring in samples, which they analyze in class according to the following guidelines.

Guidelines for Analyzing Genres

(Adapted from Tardy, Christine. Building Genre Knowledge.  Parlor Press, 2009. 108-110)

  1. Collect Samples of the Genre. For this assignment collect a number of reviews from the target publication.
  1. Identify the Scene and Describe the Situation in which the Genre is Used. Seek answers to the following questions:

SETTING:  Where does the genre appear?  How and when is it transmitted and used?  With what other genres does this genre interact?

SUBJECT:  What topics, issues, ideas, questions, etc., does this genre address?

PARTICIPANTS:  Who uses this genre?  Writers: Who writes the texts in this genre?  Are multiple writers possible?  What roles do they perform?  What characteristics must writers of this genre possess?  Under what circumstances do writers write the genre (e.g., in teams, on a computer, in a rush)?  Readers:  Who reads the texts in this genre?  Is there more than one type of reader for this genre?  What characteristics must readers of this genre possess?  Under what circumstances do readers read the genre (e.g., at their leisure, on the run, in waiting rooms)?

PURPOSES:  Why do writers write this genre and why do readers read it?  What purposes does the genre fulfill for the people who use it?

  1. Identify and Describe Patterns in the Genre’s Features.  What recurrent features do the samples share?  For example, what content is typically included?  What excluded? How is the content treated?  What sorts of examples are used?  What counts as evidence (personal testimony, facts, etc.)?  How are the texts in this genre structured?  What are they parts, and how are they organized?  In what format are texts of this genre presented?  What layout or appearance is common?  How long is a typical text in this genre?  What types of sentences do texts in the genre typically use?  How long are they?  Are they simple or complex, passive or active?  Are the sentences varied? Do they share a certain style?  What diction (types of words) is most comment?  Is a type of jargon used?  Is slang used?  How would you describe the writer’s voice?
  1. Analyze what these Patterns Reveal about the Situation and Scene. What do these patterns reveal about the genre, its situation and the scene in which it is used?  What do participants have to know or believe to understand or appreciate the genre?  Who is invited into the genre and who is excluded?  What values, believes, goals, and assumptions are revealed through the genre’s patterns?  What content is considered most important?  What content (topics or details) is ignored?

 

Students should write up their analyses and discuss in class.  This should result in a discussion that will help students see what kinds of things to consider as they write their reviews.

Week 5 – Writing in a particular genre:  the Review

Students bring in copies of their rough drafts for peer review.  The same day, the class can also focus on stylistic features that can contribute to a successful review.  Have students read Part 5 of the St. Martin’s Handbook for some ideas on “effective language”:  Chs. 24, 25, 26 and 27.

Select particular grammatical or stylistic patterns that students need help with: (e.g., organization of review, differences between summarizing and commenting, tone).

Students submit their reviews, along with a Process Report. (See Week #2.)

 

Week 6 – Midterm Portfolio and Revisions

This marks a point where students should revise some of the work they have done so far and collect it in a portfolio with a reflection on what they feel they have accomplished thus far.  What follows is the Midterm Revision Assignment to provide to students.

MIDTERM PORTFOLIO REVISION

 

PURPOSE:  This assignment should represent the best work you have done to this point in the term.  One of the components should be a substantial revision of a previously written draft of an essay.  You should bring the essay as close as you can to a polished, flawless final product.  Revised papers should have:  a clear focus, a presentation that takes a position or makes a point, effective examples in support, a coherent organization, successful opening and closing.  It should also attend to clarity, grammar, spelling, punctuation.  In a word, everything.

ASSIGNMENT:  Revise one of the three papers (Literacy Narrative, Composing Process or Review) that you have written this term.  This does not mean a hasty editing job.  This assignment counts as a separate paper, so it’s a good idea to treat it as such in terms of the time and effort you spend on it.  Furthermore, it represents your first grade in this class.

In terms of selection, choose the paper you think has the most potential for a good grade and one that you would be willing to spend another week on.    In addition include several other pieces of informal writing that you feel supports your progress to achieving the learning outcomes (rough drafts, invention activities, reading responses, genre analysis, in-class writing).  Total pages (paper and other materials) should not exceed 10 pages.

REFLECTIVE LETTER:  Write a 1 ½ – 2 page reflection on the degree to which your work on the paper you’ve selected meets at least some of the module learning goals for English Composition I

GRADING:  This paper will be graded according to the rubrics that your instructor provides.  Be sure to proofread this paper before you submit it.  [Sample portfolio rubric is in the Appendix.)

DUE DATES:  [For draft of a paper][For the reflective letter]

Reflective Letter/Essay

The reflective essay (or letter) is one of the most important essays of the term.  In it, you should discuss the degree to which the materials (especially the formal paper) in the portfolio meet module goals or learning outcomes (see below).  Have some of these goals been met, at least in part?  What remains to be worked on and why?  The reflective letter should make specific reference to evidence in the portfolio to illustrate your claims.

Instructor:  The Outcomes are included below.  These should be shared with students.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

Rhetorical Knowledge

By the end of this module, students should be able to demonstrate that they can:

  • Define and focus on a purpose or purposes
  • Interpret and respond to different audiences
  • Respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations
  • Apply conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation
  • Apply appropriate tone, diction, and level of formality
  • Demonstrate how genres shape reading and writing
  • Write in several genres

 

Critical Thinking, Reading and Writing

By the end of this module, students should be able to demonstrate that they can:

  • Employ writing and reading for inquiry, thinking, and communicating
  • Respond and evaluate texts
  • Integrate their own ideas with those of others

 

Processes

By the end of this module, students should to demonstrate that they can:

  • Recognize and articulate the value of using multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text
  • Exhibit flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proof-reading
  • Demonstrate understanding that writing is an open process that permits writers to use later invention and re-thinking to revise their work
  • Critique their own and others’ works

 

Knowledge of Conventions

By the end of this module, students should be able to demonstrate that they can:

  • Demonstrate competency in using common formats for different kinds of texts.
  • Apply a variety of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics.
  • Correctly apply in their writing such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

ASSESSMENT:  The portfolio should be assessed according to the following criteria (rubric is in Appendix):

  • Does the student understand at least some of the learning goals of the module and can he/she talk about them competently?
  • Does the evidence in the portfolio support the conclusions/assertions made in the reflective letter?

A well-written reflective essay with partial or missing support in the portfolio will not receive a high grade, nor will a poorly written reflective letter with good support.

 

Week 7 – Field Work Assignment

 

The assignment for this unit is a longer, more complex assignment that introduces the concept of research in the service of a purpose—in this case, students will work on collecting their own data, which can serve to confirm or disconfirm theories and arguments.  Possible challenges:  If gender is an inappropriate topic for your students, any assignment that asks students to go out and go their own field observations can work well.  Part 3 in the St. Martin’s Handbook is extremely useful for this unit, especially the section in Ch. 11 (“Conducting field research”).

The researched argument is essentially the purview of English Composition II, so this serves as an introduction/preparation for what students will encounter in EC II.  Thus it’s a good idea to keep this simple and avoid requiring outside research, other than providing a few readings and the students’ own field work.

Joining the Conversation – LANGUAGE AND GENDER

PURPOSE:  This assignment offers an occasion for you to join an ongoing conversation on what seems to be a perennial issue. You’ll need to become familiar with a set of discussions and debates, gather information, analyze and synthesize the data you have collected and come to conclusions, comparing your field experience to that of others, specifically the work of professional linguists and journalists.  The goal is to gain practice in incorporating (and refuting) the ideas of others in a persuasive, informative essay for an audience who has only a superficial or uninformed knowledge of the materials and activities you have studied.

ASSIGNMENT:

  1. Reading: To prepare for your fieldwork, read essays assigned for this week: Janet Holmes’ “Women Talk Too Much”, Deborah Cameron’s “What Language Barrier,” and Deborah Tannen’s “What Language Barrier” http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/oct/01/gender.books
  2. Field work: Develop a hypothesis based on one or more of the essays, then  select a specific situation to observe (friends having a meal in the cafeteria, a classroom discussion or discussions, a club or church group meeting, a family dinner conversation, a date, an online conversation), and gather data. Here are some suggestions for your observation.
  • Decide beforehand what theory from the readings you want to test out (your hypothesis). For example, you may want to confirm (or disconfirm) the theory that men interrupt more during conversations and are less likely than woman to use questions to elicit comments from others.  Simply asking people what they do won’t do it, because people aren’t always aware of their behaviors.  However, going to the dining hall and observing what men and women in fact do when they talk could tell you a lot about conversation patterns.
  • Do not use yourself as one of the participants. It’s too hard to be objective when observing your own actions.
  • The setting: Take detailed notes on the setting, describing the overall size, shape, and layout of the place where you doing your observations.  Note specifics.  Pay attention to sounds and smells as well as to what you see.  Context is often very important.
  • The people: Note the number of people.  Who are they and how are they related to one another?  What are they doing?  Describe their activities, movement, and behavior.  How do they know each other?  What is their mood?  Note ages, race, nationality, and gender.  Record overheard conversation using quotations marks.
  • Your response: As you observe, note anything that is surprising, puzzling, or unusual.  Note also your own feelings and reactions, as well as any new ideas of questions that arise.

THREE CONSIDERATIONS TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT WHEN YOU DO OBSERVATIONS (from The Call to Write by John Trimbur, Pearson/Longman, 2005):

  1. Recognize that you’ll be observing a limited group and making a limited number of observations. Your findings may confirm or dispute what you’ve read, or they may suggest new questions and lines of research.  Be aware, however, that while your results are valid for the groups you observed, the group itself may not be representative of all the students at your college, not to mention all men and women.  So when you generalize on the basis of your observations, acknowledge the scope of your research and ensure that the claims you make take these limits into account.
  1. Take into account, too, the fact that your presence can have an impact on what you observe. People sometimes behave differently when they know they’re being watched.  They may clown around, try to make themselves look good, or otherwise act in relation to the observer.  The best way to deal with this fact is to conduct multiple observations.  In many cases, people being observed will get used to the presence of the observer over time.
  1. Finally, be aware of the assumptions you bring to the observations—both when you are conducting the research and when you are analyzing the results. All researchers, of module, operate from a point of view, so there’s no reason to think you can be a neutral bystander just recording what happens.  For this reason, however, there is a very real danger that you will record in your observations only what you expected to see.  Observers’ assumptions can cause them to miss, ignore, or suppress important events.  Being conscious of your own assumptions can help keep you open to things you had not anticipated.
  1. After you have collected plenty of data, analyze your notes, trying to classify the various interactions and paying particular attention to the similarities and differences between men and women.
  • What patterns emerged? What are your findings?  What surprised you?
  • What research questions do your notes address? What issues remain to be addressed?
  1. Write a paper in which you address the question: Do men and women speak the same language?

 

Target Audience:  Readers of a national magazine; length 4 pages

Due dates:  Proposal:  [date].  (one page about what you plan to do); Fieldwork notes:  [date] (your notes on what you observed, including dialogue and body language, etc.); Rough Draft Due:  [date]; Final Draft Due:  [date]

INVENTION ACTIVITIES:  This week, students should have the opportunity to consider what they already know and believe about the topic.  Once students have read some of the articles about language and gender, class discussion can focus on a)  some of the key ideas; and b)  the style of the readings/articles and, thus, the particular genre (field work and research).

Discussions about collecting the data (observing, recording, attending to the context) would also be valuable (St. Martin’s Handbook, Ch. 11).

Week 8 – Field Work Assignment

 

Students bring in their data:  notes, descriptions, transcripts (as possible) and class time is used for helping students compile and analyze what they have (and collecting more data if necessary), then thinking about organizing this into a paper.  (Part 3—St. Martin’s Handbook)

Week 9 – Field Work Assignment

 

Peer review on rough drafts.  Help students with ongoing work on style and usage issues as they have emerged in their papers.

Submission of Final draft with process report (see Week #2)

Week 10 – Rhetorical Analysis

 

In addition to the field work assignment, this project prepares students for English Composition II.  It serves as a formal introduction to principles of rhetoric and rhetorical analysis and serves to enhance critical reading by asking students to analyze how a writer creates a credible stance for a target audience, using logical and emotional appeals.

RHETORICAL ANALYSIS

PURPOSE:  Analyzing the ways in which language works to persuade is helps us become more critical, discerning readings.  This assignment gives you the opportunity to look at the rhetorical (or persuasive) apparatus of political language, assessing the ways in which it achieves its purpose.

ASSIGNMENT:

  1. Read: Chapter 8 in The St. Martin’s Handbook.
  1. Find a brief, fairly recent argumentative text (an essay, advertisement or editorial) or select among several arguments provided by your instructor. Using the Guidelines for analyzing an argument and writing directly on a copy of the text, work to locate and annotate the moves the writer makes to persuade.  Be sure to identify the main claims, the evidence, the target audience, and the context in which the piece was written.    Bring your annotation to class.
  1. YOUR ASSIGNMENT: Write a rhetorical analysis of a short argument in which you locate how the writer works to persuade the audience.     (3-4 pages, typed, double-spaced)

AUDIENCE:  Arguments are everywhere; there is so much thrown at us that we hardly know what to believe.   Hence, your target audience for this essay is people who may be unaware of the ways in which the speaker is using language to sway public opinion.

SUGGESTIONS AND CONSTRAINTS

  • The best essays do not necessarily just locate some of the rhetorical moves; they also make a claim about a speech’s effectiveness, given the situation and target audience. You may even want to make a point about what this all means.   For example, you may discover that a statement by a candidate for a political position avoids talking about the issues, but instead makes the case for being “a true patriot,” thus emphasizing his or her persona over issues.   Your analysis would have to provide evidence and hypothesize about why this might be so.
  • The best essays will also use a style and tone appropriate to this assignment—in other words, fairly formal, using specific examples from the text, labeling quotations and examples clearly, and examining complexity.

Annotated speech:  X/XX; Rough Draft:  X/XX (bring 3 copies, one for each group member, including yourself).  Final Draft:  X/XX

Invention Activity.  The following checklist can be used to lead students through a rhetorical analysis such that they can use this to think about how to approach their rhetorical analysis assignment.  For this checklist, select an argument that deals with current events from the editorial or opinion section of a local newspaper or magazine.

Checklist for Rhetorical Analysis Checklist

John Edlund, California State University

Ethical questions (Ethos)

  • Who is this author? What can you tell from the information in the text? Does he or she have the background to speak with authority on this subject?
  • If you were going to do an internet background check on this author, what would you want to find out?
  • What sort of ethos does this writer try to project in this article? What devices does he or she use to project this ethos?
  • Do you trust this author? Do you think this author is deceptive? Why or why not?

Questions about emotional effects (Pathos)

  • Does this piece affect you emotionally? What parts?
  • Do you think the author is trying to manipulate your emotions? How?
  • Do your emotions conflict with your logical interpretation of the arguments? In what ways?

Logical questions (Logos)

  • Aristotle notes that in ordinary speaking and writing we often use what Aristotle calls a rhetorical syllogism or an enthymeme. This is an argument in which some of the premises remain unstated or are simply assumed.
  • Locate major claims and assertions you have identified in your previous analysis and work out the unstated assumptions behind them. Are these assumptions valid?
  • Look at support for major claims and ask “Is there any claim that appears to be weak or unsupported? Which one and why?”
  • Can you think of counter-arguments that the author doesn’t deal with?
  • Do you think the author has left something out on purpose? Why or why not?
  • Finally, all things considered, are you persuaded by this author’s thesis and arguments? Why or why not?

Week 11 – Rhetorical Analysis

 

Peer Review

Submission of final draft with Process Report

Week 12 – Multimodal Assignment

 

Part 4 in the St. Martin’s Handbook deals with writing in multiple media.  Although it’s more information than students need at this point, the material very useful for students, including how to plan a multimodal project and what to consider as they create it.  More and more professional and academic writing incorporates both print and image and often sound.  What follows is a fairly simply assignment that builds upon the first assignment during the term, the Literacy Narrative.  Thus, students will already have idea; the challenge will be “remediating it,” that is, creating it in a new form.

Multimodal Remediation Assignment

BACKGROUND:  Multimodality is the combination of textual, audio, and visual modes to create meaning.  In fact, Gunther Kress, professor of Semiotics and Education at the University of London, argues that multimodality is “the normal state of human communication.”   Cynthia Selfe and Pam Takayoshi echo the arguments made by many in writing studies, that:

[i]n an increasingly technological world, students need to be experienced and skilled not only in reading (consuming) texts employing multiple modalities, but also in composing in multiple modalities, if they hope to communicate successfully within the digital communication networks that characterize workplaces, schools, civic life, and span traditional cultural, national, and geopolitical borders.

What is “remediation”?  In this context, remediation means simply to reframe an argument using different media (text plus audio, visual).

ASSIGNMENT:

Remediate one of the text-based essays that you have completed this semester:  the literacy narrative.

Note that these should not only be “remediated” but they should be revised, rethought, extended, and updated within a multimodal format.

TO CONSIDER:

You can go as high tech (text plus video, audio) or low tech (PowerPoint or simply text plus photos or illustrations) as you feel comfortable with.

Here is how these “compositions” will be assessed (and the choices of audience, purpose, etc. are up to you):

  • The composition conveys a specific purpose
  • The composition identifies a specific audience—either explicitly or implicitly
  • The composition employs a tone consistent with the designated purpose and audience
  • The composition is organized around an appropriate controlling idea. This idea is clear to readers/viewers/listeners
  • The composition uses transitions to guide the audience effectively from one set of ideas to another

 

Proposal due date:  XXXX; In-class workshop:  Bring  some of the materials (text, media, etc.) that you intend to use on XXXX; Rough draft due on XXXXX:  Final Draft due on XXX

 

Instructors should collect samples (from the internet—photo-essays, public service announcements or even ads) and invite students to seek out some examples as well.  The first class period is an opportunity to explore and talk about this genre and what is practical for students to tackle.  What are the options for students?  How does incorporating another medium change the genre (e.g., the power of video or sound)?  What are the challenges?

Students should bring in proposals of what they plan to do the second class period.  This is a good time to have students discuss their proposals with each other, swapping ideas about how to do it, ensuring that the project is do-able in one week.

Week 13 – Multimodal Assignment

 

Multimodal workshop.  Students bring in their proposals, raw materials (photographs, images, text, sound) for their project.  If possible, have students work in a computer lab where they can start putting their projects together.  If not possible, have students design storyboards that lay out the visuals, audio, text, and sequencing design.

There are storyboard templates available on the internet, but to keep it simple, instructors might just ask students to figure out first what they can do, based on their technological savvy, and then do some planning in writing.

Week 14 – Final Portfolio Preparation/Reflection

 

The multimodal assignment should be due today.

Now begins the process of helping students pull together the best portfolio possible, one that represents, to the best of their ability, the achievement of the learning outcomes.  During these last weeks, students should get more feedback, revise, reflect and work on editing and proofreading.  Supplement with assignments from the St. Martin’s Handbook.

Assignment: English Composition I – Portfolios

Due Date: Final Exam Week

Portfolios play many roles in academic and professional life: artists use them to  document and to showcase their work over time; architects use them to present drawings, media, and projects to clients; writers use them to make connections between the kinds of work that they do individually and collaboratively for any number of creative, academic, and professional goals and readers.

In each case, purpose and audience help to guide your rhetorical selection of materials, your reflections on those materials, and their presentation. Portfolios are a way for you to showcase your work and to show how you’ve met the learning outcomes of the module in which you are enrolled.

First-Year Writing Digital Portfolio Requirements

  • A Reflective Essay that introduces your work to your peers, your instructor, and writing-program administrators: 750-1250 words. This is a crucial piece in your portfolio.
  • Samples of your work that support your claims about the learning outcomes:
    • rhetorical knowledge
    • critical thinking, reading, and writing
    • processes
    • knowledge of convention

The design and composition of your digital portfolio draw on the very same strategies and outcomes that you’ve been practicing during this term: readers will attribute credibility and authority to you when your design and arrangement are done with care; thoughtfully integrated examples of your work will support your reflective essay’s main points; and you will get practice in articulating and presenting your academic and professional identities.

Guidelines for the Composition, Design, & Presentation

These stages of portfolio development serve as a guide; they work differently for everyone, and no one moves through them at the same pace. Some writers reflect constantly, always making connections between assignments and pieces of writing, while other are organization-focused or spend more time in iterative drafting/design. We offer these stages here not as a prescriptive how-to guide to follow, but as a way for you to gauge your own process and to help you plan ahead:

Selection

Keep everything you’ve worked on in this module in a safe, backed-up location — notes, early drafts, final drafts, journal entries, peer and instructor feedback, everything. You might not use all of these materials in your final portfolio, but your life will be easier if you know where they all are, and when they are easily accessible.

 

Reflection

Some questions to consider for your Reflective Essay:

  • How do you define revision? What steps have you taken this semester to revise for different audiences and contexts? Provide clearly labeled specific examples.
  • To what degree does the target audience, purpose, or context impact the work in your portfolio? Provide clearly labeled specific examples.
  • How do you analyze texts (including the work of other students)? How do you define critical reading?   Provide clearly labeled specific examples.
  • What role(s) has peer review played in your development as a reader, writer and thinker?  Provide clearly labeled specific examples
  • What do you consider to be the most important components to your writing process? Why? Has that changed over the module of the semester?
  • How do you edit? How do you manage to ensure correct surface features: syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling? What considerations figure into your editing?
  • Describe your approach to writing in different genres.
  • Beyond the learning outcomes, what individual goals did you have for your reading and writing this term? What have you accomplished that you feel proud of? What would you like to continue to work on?

Reflection refers to the iterative process that we engage in when we want to look back at some activity or decision we’ve made, to think about what we’ve learned from it, and how we might use it in the future. Reflection is a powerful tool in teaching and learning — think of it as a dot-connecting mechanism — and outside of academics, reflecting is a common tool among professionals and organizations as a way to establish values, goals, and future actions:

  • What did I do?
    • What was important about what I did? Did I meet my goals?
    • When have I done this kind of work before? Where could I use this again?
    • Do I see any patterns or relationships in what I did?
    • How well did I do? What worked? What do I need to improve?
    • What should I do next? What’s my plan?

Feedback, Critique, Workshops

We recommend that you invite feedback and critique from peers and from your instructor

Week 15 – Final Portfolio Preparation

 

This week should be spent on revising, editing, mechanics, and the preparation of the reflective essay.  Because the reflective essay helps both the instructor and the student assess what students have learned, it is worth spending time on.   Have students read Chapter 65 on reflection, as well as Parts 5-10 as needed for particular problems students have with diction, sentencing, clarity and style.

Share with students the following criteria for a good reflection essay.  Essentially, this is an argumentative essay, where students make claims about how they have met (or tackled) the learning outcomes for which they need to provide evidence from their own work.

REFLECTIVE ESSAY

Criteria for Evaluation:

  • The extent to which the writer is familiar with or knows his or her writing.
  • The fit between the writer’s examination and evaluation and the evidence (the body of work contained in the portfolio).
  • The depth and sophistication of the writer’s appreciation, knowledge, and understanding of effective writing for different audiences.
  • The specificity and depth of the writer’s understanding about his or her process of writing and inquiry.

 

The kinds of things that could be in the Reflective Essay:

  1. What do you now understand are the important qualities that determine the effectiveness and strength of a piece of writing? How does the work in your portfolio demonstrate these qualities?  What does the work in your portfolio suggest you need to continue to work on?
  1. What have you learned about writing, reading and critical inquiry that might not be apparent by reading your portfolio?
  1. Discuss what you have learned or what you now understand (differently) about language, rhetorical analysis, persuasion, writing a persuasive essay, writing a personal narrative, writing a critical paper, using examples, using outside sources, and so on.
  1. Discuss, document, and evaluate the extent to which you participated in this class—your own performance.

Note:  These questions need not be answered in order.  They should merely be treated somewhere in the essay.  Here are some things you might do:

  • Discuss your best entry and why it is your best.
  • Detail the revisions you’ve made and the improvements and changes that you want readers to notice.
  • Discuss each piece of writing included, touching on the strengths of each.
  • Outline the process that one or more of your entries went through.
  • Demonstrate what this portfolio illustrates about you as a writer, student, researcher, or critical thinker.
  • Acknowledge your weaknesses but show how you’ve worked to overcome them.
  • Acknowledge the reader-respondents who have influenced your portfolio pieces and how.
  • Reflect on what you’ve learned about writing, reading, or other topics of the module.
  • Prepare your reader for a positive evaluation of your work.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s