Co-authored research on autoethnography & reflective practice accepted for presentation at 2018 APA conference

Dr. Harrison’s co-authored research on personal writing as a tool for reflective practice in sports psychology has been accepted for presentation at the 2018 American Psychological Association’s annual conference. The research, 8 years in development, addresses the need for critical reflective practice in the field of sports psychology practitioner development, and argues that autoethnography is a useful way to examine critical issues that arise such as reflexivity, subjectivity, power, and identity. Continue reading “Co-authored research on autoethnography & reflective practice accepted for presentation at 2018 APA conference”

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Literary Studies and Personal Voice: Exploring Autoethnography as a Research Method in the Graduate English Thesis

One of the ways that literature instructors can actively address states of insecurity with graduate thesis writers is by helping them develop projects that build upon strengths and interests and critically explore connections between personal and cultural experience. As such, this session seeks to expand concepts of literary research by examining the enduring paradigm of author-evacuated research (see Geertz’s 1988 Works and Lives, and Swales’ … Continue reading Literary Studies and Personal Voice: Exploring Autoethnography as a Research Method in the Graduate English Thesis

Language Learning in Higher Education: AGENCY AND INVESTMENT IN MULTILINGUAL UNIVERSITY WRITERS

Bridging passion and profession: Supporting agency and investment in multilingual university writers Marlen Harrison / Maiju Uusipaikka / Annika Karinen / Tanja Räsänen / Diana Raitala / Reetta Ellonen / Hanna Huumonen / Otto Tuomela CLICK ME TO VIEW THE ACTUAL MANUSCRIPT  ABSTRACT Throughout the last two decades, scholarship discussing learner development and autonomy has expanded from viewing the learner as one who possesses intrinsic or extrinsic motivation to a performer who to … Continue reading Language Learning in Higher Education: AGENCY AND INVESTMENT IN MULTILINGUAL UNIVERSITY WRITERS

Book Chapter: Humanizing Pedagogy and the Personal Essay

Messekher, H., Reilly, J. & Harrison, M. (2010). Humanizing pedagogy in action: Observations of an English composition classroom. In G. Park (Ed.), Observation of teaching: Bridging theory and practice through research and teaching (pp.109-122). USA: LINCOM. Abstract This paper analyzes the practices and applicability of a humanized pedagogy in the composition classroom that relies heavily on personal essay assignments. Rooted in expressivist theories of composition, the personal essay is … Continue reading Book Chapter: Humanizing Pedagogy and the Personal Essay

Qualitative Research in Psychology: Autoethnography, Sport & Identity

Running, Being, and Beijing—An Existential Exploration of a Runner Identity DOI: 10.1080/14780887.2013.810796 LINK: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14780887.2013.810796 FULL MANUSCRIPT: Click me to view document Noora Johanna Ronkainena*, Marlen Elliot Harrisonb & Tatiana V. Rybaa Abstract In this research, we explore the negotiation of a conflicted runner identity in a Finnish runner’s short-term migration to Beijing, China. We examine the historical and cultural construction of the runner identity and discuss the current discourses that … Continue reading Qualitative Research in Psychology: Autoethnography, Sport & Identity

Writing on the Edge: The Power of No – Buddhist Mindfulness and the Teaching of Composition

Harrison, M. (2012). The Power of No: Buddhist mindfulness and the teaching of composition. Writing on the Edge, 22(2), 36-46. The First Mindfulness Training: Openness Aware of the suffering created by fanaticism and intolerance, we are determined not to be idolatrous about or bound to any doctrine, theory, or ideology. (Hanh 23) As I begin reading Shanee’s1 paper, I find myself immediately feeling angry. “Why would … Continue reading Writing on the Edge: The Power of No – Buddhist Mindfulness and the Teaching of Composition